Study: NFL Has Slightly More Hispanic, Asian Players - Higher Education


Higher Education News and Jobs

Study: NFL Has Slightly More Hispanic, Asian Players

Email




by Associated Press

MIAMI

The NFL has kept a steady number of Black head coaches, while slightly increasing the ranks of Asian and Hispanic players, earning a B+ in an annual diversity study Wednesday.

However, the league didn’t get a grade for gender diversity for the fourth year in a row. The NFL is the only pro sports organization that refuses to share its league office data with University of Central Florida’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports, which also conducts annual studies on the NBA, Major League Baseball, WNBA, pro soccer and college athletics.

The last time the NFL shared its data, for the 2004 study, it received a D+ for gender hiring practices.

“We prefer to focus on our own initiatives to enhance diversity and inclusiveness in our workplace,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said.

Richard Lapchick, report author and head of UCF’s diversity institute in Orlando, Fla., said the league data would probably BE better than the NFL’s most recent grade. At the team level, 18 percent of senior administrators were women for 2007, along with 11 percent of vice presidents, according to the newest report.

Lapchick compiled that information from media guides for the NFL’s 32 teams. He goes through the same process for other sports, then usually sends a compilation to the league for feedback and corroboration. All but the NFL respond, he said.

However, Lapchick gives the NFL credit for its own improvement initiatives, like the Rooney Rule. The change, approved in 2002, requires teams to interview at least one minority candidate for each head coaching vacancy.

  Survey Offers New View of College Millennials in Media

The NFL has six Black head coaches and five Black general managers entering this season, the same as 2007. There were two Black coaches in 2001, six in 2005 and seven in 2006.

Four new head coaches, all White, were hired entering the 2008 season.

“I don’t read anything into that,” Lapchick said. “With all leagues on any given cycle, it can turn out that way or it can turn out that a disproportionate percentage were coaches of color that were hired.”

In the 2007 season, 66 percent of NFL players were Black, a one point decrease from the previous year. White players continued to comprise 31 percent of the total, but the difference was made up by a small increase in Hispanic and Asian players.

For assistant head coaches, in 2007 the league sustained the previous year’s record with 38 percent of the jobs filled by minorities.

Click here to post and read comments



© Copyright 2005 by DiverseEducation.com

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Accessibility Is Hallmark of Vargas Presidency Kendall Basham, who graduated in May 2017 from Southeast Missouri State University, always had been an admirer of the university president, Dr. Carlos Vargas-Aburto. To surprise Basham on her birthday, Dylan Kennedy, a senior and vice president of So...
UCLA Course to Examine Race Through Lens of Black Horror Films, Literature Tananarive Due is bringing a highly anticipated Get Out-inspired course to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) this semester. Tananarive Due The “The Sunken Place: Racism, Survival and Black Horror Aesthetic” course is based on di...
Innovative Strategies for HBCUs Proposed at CBC Conference WASHINGTON — A range of solutions and strategies — from the adoption of new business models to one-on-one mentoring from African Americans who’ve attained C-Suite positions — emerged Thursday at the inaugural HBCU “braintrust” of the Congressional Bl...
Brigham Young University Ends Ban on Caffeinated Soda Sales SALT LAKE CITY — Mormon church-owned Brigham Young University ended a six-decade ban Thursday on the sale of caffeinated soft drinks on campus, surprising students by posting a picture of a can of Coca-Cola on Twitter and just two words: “It’s happen...
Semantic Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *