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Information Technology at Johnson C. Smith University Featured in TV Report

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Information Technology at Johnson C. Smith University Featured in TV Report
By Ronald Roach

]CHARLOTTE, N.C.

Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU) and its information technology program became the focus of a three-minute feature story on the television series, “American Business Review” hosted by Morley Safer. The segment first aired on Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) stations across the country last month, and has the potential to air multiple times during prime time programming over the next year.

The JCSU segment on the “American Review Series” has highlighted the value of small colleges impact by providing their students with the latest technology and skills. In the news story, Jihad Muhammad, a JCSU computer science major, and school president Dr. Dorothy Cowser discuss the information technology initiative on campus and its advantages to students.

“As soon as I came to Johnson C. Smith and looked at the campus and the buildings, you could see that the university really had a commitment to technology and giving students access,” Muhammad says in the report.

In fall 2000, JCSU became one of the first historically Black colleges to provide a laptop computer to every student. Students and their school-provided laptops have complete access to the campus-wide network and Internet services. Since 1994, the ratio of computers to students has improved from 1:10 to 1:1, according to school officials.



© Copyright 2005 by DiverseEducation.com

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