Plan Expands College Classes For High Schoolers - Higher Education
Higher Education News and Jobs

Plan Expands College Classes For High Schoolers

Email


by LISA RATHKE, Associated Press


MONTPELIER Vt. — Gov. Peter Shumlin has unveiled a plan to get more Vermont students into college and better prepared for jobs by expanding a program that allows them to take college-level courses in high school.

The proposal would expand the dual enrollment program to allow more high school juniors and seniors to attend college classes, for free. Students would be able to attend up to two classes at the Vermont State Colleges, the University of Vermont, and participating private institutions.

“We think this is a great opportunity to be able to take students who currently aren’t getting beyond high school or who are having trouble affording college which is our biggest challenge right now facing Vermont’s college-bound students and give them the opportunity to get up to a year of college credit while they’re in high school,” Shumlin said. “Now that’s a huge development.”

The courses would cost $150 if taken at the high school and $350 if taught at the college and would be financed by $800,000 in state funding over two years. After that the state would cover half the cost, with the high schools covering the rest.

The proposal is part of a package the governor has proposed and a coalition of education officials, colleges and business leaders support. The plan aims to ensure all Vermont children have access to quality education including programs in science, technology, engineering and math, and opportunities to go to college and get job training, the governor said.

About 600 high school juniors and seniors and 300 technical center students across the state are taking college courses, said Tim Donovan, chancellor of the Vermont State Colleges.

That’s about 1 in 7 high school seniors, he said.

The opportunity has had an extraordinary impact not just on the kids who are already planning to go to college but to those who are wavering, he said.

The goal of the latest proposal is to make the program available to more kids.

“It will make higher education more affordable for Vermont students at a very early age; it will knock down those financial barriers for access to success for our students in our Vermont colleges and universities and importantly it will advance and encourage students to graduate on time, which, of course, has a financial as well as an academic impact,” said UVM president Tom Sullivan.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
State of the Union Address Omitted Key Concerns in Education, Experts Note President Donald Trump President Donald J. Trump delivered his first State of the Union address since taking office, calling the current era “our new American moment.” But he missed an opportunity for substantive conversation on the growing conce...
Mississippi Universities Seek More State Funds, Outline Budget Woes JACKSON, Miss. — Leaders of Mississippi's eight public universities are ringing alarm bells about state funding, saying they could lose their ability to compete if funding cuts from recent years aren't restored. In presentations Monday to legi...
Student-Athletes Share Perspectives at Intercollegiate Athletics Forum  Giving student-athletes opportunities to achieve academic excellence was a recurring theme at this year’s Intercollegiate Athletics Forum held in New York City this week.  How do colleges and universities make sure that student-athletes are havin...
Minority-Serving Institutions Anxious Over Tax Bill While the Senate Republicans just passed a major tax overhaul on Friday, higher education writ at-large has been wringing its hands for weeks. Especially for colleges and universities with large minority populations, the bill would only pile on more ...
Semantic Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *