North Carolina HBCUs Write Governor About Concerns - Higher Education

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North Carolina HBCUs Write Governor About Concerns

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by Associated Press

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. — The leaders of historically Black colleges and universities in North Carolina have written Gov. Pat McCrory about challenges they face.

The three-page letter was signed by Fayetteville State University Chancellor James Anderson on behalf of 11 schools across the state, The Fayetteville Observer reported.

The schools cite problems with changes in federal financial aid policies, state funding cuts, outdated infrastructure, and a lack of scholarship support.

The letter says the schools are working on a plan to deal with the issues. McCrory had asked the schools to put together a plan following a meeting with school leaders earlier this year.

The letter says the schools have an impact of about $1.4 billion and employ about 19,000 people. North Carolina has the largest block of historically black colleges and universities in the nation.

About 221,000 students attend the schools in North Carolina.

“I presume that the strategic plan will serve as a valued source of information that he will use,” Anderson said.

Ryan Tronovitch with McCrory’s office says the schools play a big role in the state’s future workforce.

“Gov. McCrory looks forward to working with the presidents and chancellors of North Carolina’s historically black colleges and universities and hearing their input on important education issues,” Tronovitch said.

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