Harvard Scholar Henry Louis Gates to Host African-American History Series - Higher Education


Higher Education News and Jobs

Harvard Scholar Henry Louis Gates to Host African-American History Series

Email




by Ronald Roach

 

Henry Gates

Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. will narrate the series, which charts the evolution of the African-American people.

Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. returns to television this fall to narrate the six-part documentary series “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates Jr.,” which presents a sweeping look at African-American history from the early 1500s to present-day America.

The series, which debuts October 22 and airs weekly through November 26 on PBS television stations, charts the evolution of the African-American people, exploring a wide range of cultural, political, religious and social developments that have defined the African-American experience in the U.S.

“The story of the African-American people is the story of the settlement and growth of America itself, a universal tale that all people should experience,” Gates said in a statement.

“Since my senior year in high school, when I watched Bill Cosby narrate a documentary about Black history, I’ve longed to share those stories in great detail to the broadest audience possible, young and old, Black and White, scholars and the general public. I believe that my colleagues and I have achieved this goal through ‘The African Americans:  Many Rivers to Cross,’” added Gates, who is the Alphonse Fletcher University professor at Harvard University and director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research.

During the series, Gates will take viewers to locations throughout the U.S. where he visits important historical sites, engages top historians, and interviews individuals who witnessed and participated in momentous events. Historical figures featured in the series include school integration pioneers Ruby Bridges and Charlayne Hunter-Gault, former Black Panther Kathleen Neal Cleaver, and former Secretary of State Colin Powell.

  Renowned Black Law Professor Files Complaint Against Campbell University for Discrimination

Over the past decade, public television audiences have grown familiar with documentary productions written and hosted by Gates. His past PBS series have largely focused on genealogy and topics related to the African Diaspora. Previous productions include “Finding Your Roots” (2012), “Black in Latin America” (2011), “Faces of America” (2010), “Looking for Lincoln “(2009), “African American Lives 2”(2008), “Oprah’s Roots” (2007), and “African American Lives” (2006).

Gates has said that he hopes to see the series have an educational impact that informs how Americans discuss and view race. “How can I help with the conversation about race? Schools are tools for the formation of citizenship. My target is the school curriculum: getting an integrated story told,” he told The Washington Post.

He notes that the upcoming series begins its exploration of African-American history with the African sailor who traveled to North America as a free man accompanying Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon who arrived in Florida in 1513. This was more than a century before the first 20 Africans arrived in Jamestown, Va., in 1620, according to Gates.

Historical accounts of Blacks in North America have typically begun with the Jamestown story. “Nobody [has been] talking about those first 107 years of African-American history,” Gates has said.

The series schedule is as follows:

 

Episode One: The Black Atlantic (1500–1800) – Tuesday, October 22, 8-9 pm.

Episode Two: The Age of Slavery (1800–1860) – Tuesday, Oct. 29, 8-9 pm.

Episode Three: Into the Fire (1861–1896) – Tuesday, Nov. 5, 8-9 pm.

Episode Four: Making a Way Out of No Way (1897–1940) – Tuesday, Nov. 12, 8-9 pm.

  UMKC Professor Pearlie Johnson Uses Quilts to Teach Black History

Episode Five: Rise! (1940–1968) – Tuesday, November 19, 8-9 pm.

Episode Six: It’s Nation Time (1968–2013) – Tuesday, Nov. 26, 8-9 pm.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
UCLA Course to Examine Race Through Lens of Black Horror Films, Literature Tananarive Due is bringing a highly anticipated Get Out-inspired course to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) this semester. Tananarive Due The “The Sunken Place: Racism, Survival and Black Horror Aesthetic” course is based on di...
Innovative Strategies for HBCUs Proposed at CBC Conference WASHINGTON — A range of solutions and strategies — from the adoption of new business models to one-on-one mentoring from African Americans who’ve attained C-Suite positions — emerged Thursday at the inaugural HBCU “braintrust” of the Congressional Bl...
Lawmaker Condemns Student Video Depicting Police Beheading MILWAUKEE — A university student’s video depicting the beheading of a police officer drew a strongly worded rebuke from a Wisconsin state lawmaker who denounced the imagery as “vile” and an attempt to incite violence. The video shows University of...
Cornell Student Charged in Attack Apologizes for Behavior ITHACA, N.Y. — A White Cornell University student charged with beating a Black student has apologized for the language he used during an attack that police say may have been racially motivated. Nineteen-year-old John Greenwood issued a statement T...
Semantic Tags:

3 Responses to Harvard Scholar Henry Louis Gates to Host African-American History Series

  1. Exciting! I am looking forward to this and will tell as many folks as I can about this series. After all, our youth are not knowledgeable at all about our history; it is not taught or even thought of in our public school curriculums. Our young Black Americans do not know our history for they have not been exposed to it. The older of our generation are not as fluent as can be for lack of continuity and opportunity to indulge in continued study in this most important aspect of our lives. Thank you so much for doing this!!!

    Emma Mays-Reynolds
    August 9, 2013 at 11:48 am

  2. I can’t wait! I have already started to get the word out to everyone. This could not have came at a better time; because I ran across this web page, trying to find out some information on Professor Gates. I love history, and the older generation in my family have all passed on; leaving me with family history, that I must check further into.
    Some schools don’t teach history correctly; which causes our children to be wrongly informed.
    Thank you for taking the time to educate us.

    Tonya Paige-Pyles
    August 16, 2013 at 9:29 am

  3. I have to say I’m also very exited about this series.I am African American , and my children are homeschooled.This will be very educational for them as well as me.Traditional schools teach nothing about Black history.I hope more programs of this content follow in the future.

    Keosha Woods
    October 1, 2013 at 6:38 am

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *