Tenn. Senate Approves Haslam’s Free Tuition Plan - Higher Education
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Tenn. Senate Approves Haslam’s Free Tuition Plan

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by Associated Press


NASHVILLE, Tenn. ― Gov. Bill Haslam’s signature proposal to create a program that would cover tuition at two-year colleges for any high school graduate is a step closer to the governor’s desk.

The Senate approved the plan 30-1 on Monday. The companion bill was scheduled to be heard on the House floor.

Called “Tennessee Promise,” the legislation is a cornerstone of Haslam’s “Drive to 55” campaign to improve the state’s graduation rates from the current 32 percent to 55 percent by 2025 to help improve overall job qualifications and attract employers to the state.

Haslam wants to pay for the program by using $300 million in excess lottery reserve funds and join it with a $47 million endowment.

One concern of higher education officials and lawmakers is making sure the plan is adequately funded.

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