Ho-Chunk Tribe Hopes Change Sends More to College - Higher Education


Higher Education News and Jobs

Ho-Chunk Tribe Hopes Change Sends More to College

Email




by Associated Press

050614_Ho_ChunkMADISON, Wis. ― The Ho-Chunk tribal legislature has proposed a policy it hopes will encourage members to better themselves after high school.

The tribe wants to delay trust fund dividend payouts and tie them to achievements such as college, work and military service, the Wisconsin State Journal reported. The tribe has a shortage of qualified professionals in fields including health care, IT, accounting and management.

“We’re hoping that the tribal membership considers putting incentives in there for our young people to explore options for postsecondary education,” said Adrienne Thunder, executive director of the Ho-Chunk education department.

In 2001, the tribe started requiring a high school diploma for 18-year-olds to collect their trust fund dividend payouts. This year’s graduates will collect about $200,000 each before taxes. It’s partly why Ho-Chunk high school graduation rates have increased dramatically in a generation.

The tribe declined to provide data about college enrollment and graduation rates through the years. But in a recent survey of 18- to 30-year-old Ho-Chunk members, 68 percent of respondents who said they started college at any level didn’t finish.

Kim Ramirez and Jose-Luis Ramirez, who is a native of Mexico, support further changing the policy about the dividend payouts, commonly known as “18 money.”

It will help keep the couple’s three children focused on long-term goals and allow them to avoid temptations that commonly trap 18-year-olds when the money comes in a lump sum.

Kim Ramirez dropped out of Black River Falls High School in 10th grade and now works in a factory, along with her husband. They want their children to work with their minds.

  Bishop State nursing director resigns

“She said she doesn’t want me to follow in her steps,” their daughter Deanna Ramirez said of her mother. She is finishing her sophomore year in high school and wants to go to college.

The Ho-Chunk also recently formed partnerships with University of Wisconsin System schools that they hope will boost enrollment. At UW-Eau Claire, a Ho-Chunk living and learning community will be established at a nearby property that formerly housed a Catholic priory in the fall of 2015. At UW-Madison, the tribe is in talks to join a partnership aimed at getting more American Indian youth on campus during their high school years to learn about technology.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Idaho Initiative Helps Admit 20,000 Students to College BOISE, Idaho — The Idaho State Board of Education has announced that more than 20,000 high school students have been admitted to Idaho’s public colleges and universities. According to the board, this is the third year students with qualifying grad...
Advocates: Support Vital for Students From Foster Care System When it comes to accessing college, students who have experienced the foster care system have a steep hill to climb. Data about their college-going rates is scant, but existing studies indicate that while the majority of foster youth say that they wa...
Kalamazoo Valley Community College President Plans to Retire KALAMAZOO, Mich. — The longtime president of Kalamazoo Valley Community College plans to retire. The Kalamazoo Gazette reports that Marilyn Schlack, who has held the post since 1982, submitted a letter of retirement at the school’s board of truste...
After Decades of Pushing Bachelor’s Degrees, U.S. Needs More Tradespeople FONTANA, Calif. — At a steel factory dwarfed by the adjacent Auto Club Speedway, Fernando Esparza is working toward his next promotion. Esparza is a 46-year-old mechanic for Evolution Fresh, a subsidiary of Starbucks that makes juices and smoothie...
Semantic Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *