Fighting Hawks Picked as University of North Dakota Nickname - Higher Education
Higher Education News and Jobs

Fighting Hawks Picked as University of North Dakota Nickname

by By Dave Kolpack, Associated Press

FARGO, N.D. ― University of North Dakota backers have selected Fighting Hawks as the school’s new nickname, the school announced Wednesday.

The predatory bird mascot was declared the winner after receiving 57 percent of the vote compared to 43 percent for Roughriders in the two-nickname runoff. The vote was open to people with UND ties, including students, staff and alums, and 27,378 votes were cast. The new nickname replaces the Fighting Sioux name that was retired by the state Board of Higher Education in 2012 because the NCAA deemed it “hostile and abusive.”

The school did not release vote totals among the stakeholders, but the UND student body president has said many students prefer Fighting Hawks because it retains some elements of the old nickname and logo. Some versions of Fighting Hawks logos made the rounds on social media, but the school has not endorsed a design.

The path to the new name was often arduous.

In May, a committee began debating about 1,200 nicknames that had been approved by a consultant after a monthlong campaign to solicit suggestions from the public. The group gradually whittled down the list to 15, then seven, and then the final five. It took three rounds of voting before the winning selection received at least 50 percent of the vote, as school officials wanted.

The final five were: Fighting Hawks; Roughriders; Nodaks; Sundogs; and North Stars.

Some alumni and fans lashed out at the decision to not include the option of no nickname on the final ballot. UND President Robert Kelley said it wasn’t in the best interests of the school to move forward without a new moniker and said the school “will always be North Dakota.”

The NCAA disputed the Fighting Sioux nickname and forced UND to retire it after the school failed to win approval to keep it from the state’s two tribes. The Spirit Lake Tribe voted to keep the name but the Standing Rock Sioux held no vote on the matter. State residents voted overwhelmingly in early 2012 to dump the nickname and American Indian head logo that was first unveiled in the 1930s and redesigned by a Native American UND alumnus in 1999.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
White People Need Diversity, Too At my university and many others, “diversity” is like Frank's RedHot sauce, “they put that sh*t on everything!” It is drenched on mission and value statements. It is mixed into committees and task forces established to examine the ills facing Blac...
Increase in American Suicides Has Historical Roots The recent suicides of fashion designer Kate Spade https and CNN celebrity chef host Anthony Bourdain last week sent shock waves throughout much of the entertainment industry. Reaction from the public was one of incredulity. Millions of people took t...
Health Insurance Remains an Issue for Students and Recent Grads The summer months and the period following graduation can leave some college students and recent graduates scrambling to find affordable, year-round health insurance if they lack coverage under a school or parent’s health plan. Dr. Linda Blumberg...
At NCORE, Symone Sanders Calls for Civility in Discourse NEW ORLEANS—More than 3,500 students, faculty and staff from colleges and universities across the nation are gathering here this week to engage in critical discussions about race relations on their college campus in particular, and in society in gene...
Semantic Tags: