Tennessee State University Raising Admissions Standards - Higher Education
Higher Education News and Jobs

Tennessee State University Raising Admissions Standards

Email


by Associated Press


NASHVILLE, Tenn. ― Tennessee State University is planning to raise admissions standards for the next incoming class in an effort to draw higher-performing students who will have a greater likelihood to graduate.

WPLN-FM reports the historically Black university in Nashville has the lowest average freshman ACT scores and graduation rates among the state’s public universities.

TSU President Glenda Glover says one barrier to student success has been that the school hasn’t been selective enough, and that higher-achieving students may be applying elsewhere because requirements seemed too low.

Glover said data has shown that high school grade point average is the best way to predict which students will graduate. The school is raising its minimum GPA from 2.25 to 2.5, and increasing the ACT requirement by one point to 19.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Success Formula for Student Recruitment and Retention “Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker Most colleges and universities compete within many of the same geo-markets for a diverse pool of prospects. Within those markets, the institutions that have...
Report Card: States Fail High-Achieving Low-Income Students States have made little progress in supporting high-achieving, low-income students, according to a new report by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation.  Released this week, the second edition of the report “Equal Talents, Unequal Opportunities” issued se...
Buffalo Soldier Gets Historical Marker on Tennessee State Campus Tennessee State University will bestow an honor on one of its alumni, Lt. William McBryar, a Buffalo Soldier who was awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in 1890 during the Cherry Creek Campaign in the Arizona Territory. On Tuesday, the universi...
Education of Student-Athletes a Hot Topic at Panel Discussion For all the heightened chatter this year about whether college student-athletes should be paid, Dr. Kenneth Shropshire suggests that making their education a priority is more important than a microscopic focus on financial compensation. ”The most ...
Semantic Tags: