UVa Administrator Files Gender Discrimination Lawsuit - Higher Education
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UVa Administrator Files Gender Discrimination Lawsuit

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by Associated Press

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — An administrator at the University of Virginia is suing the school for alleged gender and disability discrimination.

Media outlets report UVA assistant vice provost Becky Ackerson filed a lawsuit against the UVA Board of Visitors Wednesday claiming the school knowingly paid her less than male counterparts.

According to the lawsuit, Ackerson was hired in 2012 to help with mapping out a five-year plan. Her supervisors allegedly leaned heavily on her to carry the workload while her peers made more money than she did.

Through negotiations, Ackerson was able to get her salary raised from $70,000 to $100,000 — still less than other high-ranking employees.

The lawsuit also says the university refused to accommodate her when she suffered chronic fatigue on the job.

University spokesman Anthony de Bruyn declined to comment.

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