N.C. Governor Calls for ‘BathroomBill’ Repeal in State of State - Higher Education
Higher Education News and Jobs

N.C. Governor Calls for ‘BathroomBill’ Repeal in State of State

by Gary D. Robertson, Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper urged lawmakers gathered Monday night to repeal the state’s “bathroom bill” very soon, saying the law is “the dark cloud hanging over our state of promise” by harming North Carolina’s economy and reputation.

Delivering his first State of the State speech as governor to the Republican-controlled legislature, Cooper almost immediately addressed the law known as House Bill 2, which limits LGBT rights and the restrooms transgender people can use in schools and other government buildings.

Cooper, the attorney general for the past 16 years, narrowly defeated GOP Gov. Pat McCrory last fall with a platform that emphasized McCrory’s support for HB2. He said people are sick of the law and wondering whether “this heavy anchor weighing us down” will be cut away.

“The law has damaged our state. The legislature must erase this law from our books,” Cooper told House and Senate members gathered in the House chamber for the biennial gubernatorial speech. “It drains the energy from what should be our work for the people of this state.”

Cooper and GOP legislators also have been entangled over what to do about the law, which has caused some businesses and sporting events to spurn North Carolina in the name of fighting discrimination, leading to moving last month’s NBA All-Star game out of Charlotte and NCAA championships from the state this academic year.

Compromises have crumbled since December. Pressure has increased to find a solution before the NCAA soon decides whether to remove North Carolina locations from a bid to host championship events through 2022. Cooper wants a complete HB2 repeal, but Republicans say some additional restrictions are necessary.

“Pass a compromise repeal that works to eliminate discrimination and brings back jobs, sports and entertainment and I will sign it – as long as it truly gets the job done,” he said, adding “let’s do it this week. It’s time to move on.”

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Running for Maryland Governor, Ben Jealous Puts Focus on Education Maryland gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous on the stump. BALTIMORE — On a recent Saturday, Benjamin Todd Jealous was up early, getting ready for a full day of campaign stops. The former president of the National Association for the Advancement ...
The Case for Diversity I'm a privileged, old White guy who won the ovary lottery. Consequently, I was able to grow up in the right ZIP code and take advantage of the opportunities afforded to me by sheer dumb luck. As a result, I wound up being an academic surgeon and w...
OSU Names Scholar Moore Vice Provost for Diversity, Inclusion The Ohio State University has named Dr. James L. Moore III, a prominent researcher and scholar, as its next vice provost for diversity and inclusion. Moore – the Education and Human Ecology’s Distinguished Professor of Urban Education and executiv...
Study: When College Tuition Goes Up, Campus Diversity Goes Down As college tuition continues to rise at a staggering rate, people tend to worry about how much harder it becomes for students and families to pay for college. In an article in The Conversation online, researchers who focus on higher education said...
Semantic Tags: