How Colleges Can Admit Better Students - Higher Education
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How Colleges Can Admit Better Students

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how-colleges-can-admit-better-students-squashed“As colleges nationwide prepare to announce this month which applicants they have decided to accept, it’s worth asking why so many admissions offices pass up easy opportunities to admit higher-quality students.

Nearly all colleges, for example, make use of two metrics to gauge student quality: cumulative high school grade point average and composite score on the ACT (the most widely taken college admissions exam). But research has shown that these metrics are imperfect: They are less predictive of student success than alternative measures that are equally simple to calculate and whose use would lead to a better incoming class.”

Read the full story via The New York Times

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