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Hine Retiring from Northwestern U. Endowed Professorship

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by Jamal Eric Watson

Dr. Darlene Clark Hine — known in the academy as the dean of African-American women’s history — is retiring from her endowed professorship at Northwestern University.

President Barack Obama presented Dr. Darlene Clark Hine with the National Humanities Medal for outstanding achievements in history in 2014.

Hine, who is the Board of Trustees Professor of African American Studies and History, will be honored this weekend during a two-day symposium that will feature former students, collaborators and current scholars who have been engaged with various aspects of her work.

Presented with the National Humanities Medal for outstanding achievements in history by President Obama in 2014, Hine has spent the last 13 years of her career at Northwestern University. Previously, she was at Michigan State University.

“We had been told by others that Darlene was unmovable and that she was very happy at MSU, but I took the institution seriously when they said that we should think big,” said Dr. Dwight McBride, the dean of the Graduate School at Northwestern who was instrumental in luring her away from MSU in 2004 while he was chair of the African American Studies department. “You can’t do African American history and not encounter Darlene Clark Hine.”

Hosted by the Center for African American History and the Department of African American Studies, the symposium will include well-known scholars like Drs. Evelynn M. Hammonds, Deborah Gray White and Wanda Hendricks discussing how their research was inspired by Hine’s scholarship.

A prolific researcher, Hine is the author of several books and articles, including Black Women in White. She is the editor of the two-volume encyclopedia Black Women in America.

“Dr. Hine’s work has served as the foundation for several generations of scholars,” said Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans, professor and chair of African American Studies, Africana Women’s Studies & History at Clark Atlanta University. “She is an institution that transcends institutions and her theoretical, methodological, and topical contributions to several historical fields is indelible,” Evans added. “In addition to the intellectual contribution, her professional impact through formal and informal mentoring can be seen in the imprint of those who are now mentoring others.”

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For more information on the symposium, click here

Jamal Eric Watson can be reached at jwatson1@diverseeducation.com. You can follow him on Twitter @jamalericwatson

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