Missouri State University Settles with Student Who Wouldn’t Counsel Gays - Higher Education
Higher Education News and Jobs

Missouri State University Settles with Student Who Wouldn’t Counsel Gays

Email




by Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — Missouri State University has agreed to pay $25,000 to a former student who sued after he was removed from a master’s degree counseling program because he said he wouldn’t counsel gay couples.

Andrew Cash sued the university in April. The settlement with the Missouri State Board of Governors was final last month but reported Monday after The Springfield News-Leader submitted an open records request.

The $25,000 is the estimated cost for Cash to obtain a master’s degree at another university.

University spokeswoman Suzanne Shaw says the settlement will be paid from the state’s legal defense fund. The settlement prevents Cash from seeking admission or employment at Missouri State and the university did not admit liability.

Cash said in his lawsuit that he was removed from the program in 2014 after he tried to complete his internship at the Springfield Marriage and Family Institute, a Christian-based counseling agency and told a class he couldn’t counsel gay couples. His internship coordinator, Kristi Perryman, told Cash his refusal to work with gay couples went against the American Counseling Association’s code of ethics, and he couldn’t continue his internship at the Springfield Marriage and Family Institute because of “ethical concerns,” according to the lawsuit.

Cash was placed on a remediation plan and told that his internship hours at the institute would not count. In November 2014, he was removed from the master’s program despite having a 3.81 GPA, according to the lawsuit.

Cash claimed in the lawsuit that he was “targeted and punished for expressing his Christian worldview.”

Related:  Shattering the Silences: The Case for Minority Faculty. - movie reviews

In 2006, the university paid about $27,000 to another student, Emily Brooker, who accused the School of Social Work and a faculty member of violating her First Amendment rights when she refused to sign a letter supporting same-sex adoption.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Baylor Leader: School Will Exceed Laws to Protect Students WACO, Texas — The new president of Baylor University says school officials will exceed state and federal laws in ensuring that students are not subjected to sexual violence. Linda Livingstone says a university president is ultimately responsible f...
Purdue University Taking Over For-profit Kaplan Chain WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue University is taking over the for-profit Kaplan University chain in order to expand its reach into online education. Purdue’s Board of Trustees approved the deal Thursday with Kaplan, which currently enrolls 32,000 st...
N.Y. College President Heard Blaming Alleged Assault Victim SANBORN, N.Y. — A New York community college president who was recorded disparaging an alleged victim of sexual assault has retired, just before a vote to consider firing him. Niagara County Community College says James Klyczek notified the board ...
Georgia Bans Funding to ‘Sanctuary’ Campuses Under New Law ATLANTA — Private colleges that don’t cooperate with federal immigration authorities would lose state funding for scholarships and research under a new Georgia law. Republican Gov. Nathan Deal signed the measure on Thursday. The measure is expe...
Semantic Tags: