Higher Education News and Jobs
by Lois Elfman

Graduation rates for African-American Division I men’s basketball student-athletes are rising, but gaps with their White teammates persists.

Read more
by

Florida A&M University (FAMU) board of trustees recently approved a new initiative that positions the institution as a central educational resource on the benefits of medical marijuana use as an alternate health remedy.

Read more
by Jamaal Abdul-Alim

If you’re in the habit of spewing negative statistics about the education of Black students in the United States, expect to draw the ire of Dr. Ivory A. Toldson.

Read more

by

Dr. Shaun R. Harper received two major awards this past week for his ongoing research focused on race, diversity, and equity and inclusion work.

Read more
by

The University of the District of Columbia’s Center for Urban Agriculture and Gardening Education (CUAGE) has taken a collaborative approach to addressing food deserts in the surrounding metropolitan area. Through community programs and the launch of several urban food hubs, the university has empowered thousands of residents with the knowledge and gardening techniques to improve their food and water security.

Read more
by

Schools of education are increasingly prioritizing efforts to diversify the teacher workforce, but they can do a better job preparing teacher candidates to be culturally competent and effective instructors, particularly for students in diverse schools and communities, according to a new report this week from Bellwether Education Partners.

Read more

VIEWS >>

A Room of One’s Own White Colleagues

by Marcos J. Del Hierro

Every spring, I dread putting together my annual review materials. In March, a predominantly-White room full of senior colleagues will discuss whether I meet their standard of what a good scholar, teacher and university citizen should be. I have nothing to worry about, right?

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Putting Students First

In this issue: Three California State University institutions ranked among the Most Promising Places to Work in Student Affairs.


BLOG >>

Will Whites Be Stereotyped as Corrupt Because of Felicity Huffman?

Will Whites Be Stereotyped as Corrupt Because of Felicity Huffman?

by

The recent bust in Boston of an organized, professionalized, high-stakes college admissions fraud operation reveals much more than the amoral conduct of the participants. The parents, who included actor Felicity Huffman of Desperate Housewives television fame and Oscar nominee, and William H. Macy, veteran of dozens of movies, were willing to pay into the millions of dollars for ringers to take standardized tests for their children or to gin up false evidence of athletic potential.

The Myth of Meritocracy

The Myth of Meritocracy

by

To my high school guidance counselor, I wasn’t college material. I remember flipping through the dusty pages of the massive dictionary in the school library to find the definition of the word meritocracy: “the holding of power by people selected based on their ability.” I needed to understand why she repeated that word to me and some of my classmates to limit our options.

Diversity and Rep. Ilhan Omar

Diversity and Rep. Ilhan Omar

by

To show my San Francisco State journalism class what diversity means instantly, I provide a visual: I draw a square on a white board. That’s the media. All White. Diversity is to see the white board obliterated with dots representing a multitude of voices.

by

West Virginia legislatures and post-secondary officials have expressed their support for recently passed Senate Bill 1, legislation that supporters say could open new economic opportunities and establish an industry talent pipeline in West Virgina’s community colleges. Lawmakers from both houses passed SB1 toward the end of a recent meeting, creating the West Virginia Invests Grant Program. […]

Read more
by

Dr. G. Duncan Harris didn’t always know that he wanted to work at a community college. But as a youngster, he grew up on college campuses.

Read more
by

For Pablo Avila, working in higher education wasn’t something that he thought he’d ever be doing professionally. In fact, up until a few years ago, he was thinking about pursuing a Ph.D. in social psychology.

Read more
by

Dr. J. Gregory “Greg” Hodges began his career as a third grade public school teacher, and had planned to stay in elementary education for the rest of his life. However, his career path took a turn and he soon became exposed to the higher education sphere.

Read more
by

It is a bittersweet moment for LaGuardia Community College president Dr. Gail O. Mellow, who announced that she is stepping down after more than 20 years of service to the institution.

Read more

Black Issues

by Jamaal Abdul-Alim

If you’re in the habit of spewing negative statistics about the education of Black students in the United States, expect to draw the ire of Dr. Ivory A. Toldson.

Read more
by

Now in its 13th year, the annual Black, Brown & College Bound Summit has become one of the nation’s most recognized convenings focused on improving outcomes for young Black and Latino men in college.

Read more
by

Institutional leaders, elected officials, advocates and other supporters of the nation’s historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) were in attendance Tuesday for the United Negro College Fund’s (UNCF) inaugural State of the HBCU Address, which put forth a comprehensive legislative agenda for Congressional members to further support HBCUs and their capacity to be engines of socioeconomic mobility for the students they serve.

Read more

Latino Issues

by

Showcasing both the ingenuity and struggles of Latinx scholars in the academy, this year’s American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) conference focused on the future.

Read more
by

The goal of the HSI Pathways program is to increase the number of Latino faculty in the humanities. Funded by a five-year, $5.1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the program is on track to prepare 90 students from Florida International University, the University of Texas El Paso and California State University, Northridge – all Hispanic serving institutions (HSIs) – for careers in academia.

Read more
by

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has announced the launch of a new fellowship program that seeks to increase the number of Hispanic leaders in presidential positions across higher education.

Read more

Asian American Issues

by Lois Elfman

Now in his second year as an assistant professor at Franklin & Marshall College, Dr. Mark Redondo Villegas is propelling students and colleagues to explore issues of race and identity.

Read more
by

Cilantro is a good example for showing the stupidity of racial stereotypes. The herb, also known as coriander and Chinese parsley, is a staple in some cuisines to the surprise of diners of varying backgrounds who report it tastes like soap. It turns out that whether you like this seasoning or want to spit it out depends on your genetics — your heritage.

Read more
by Lydia Lum

A new report lists multiple ways in which lawmakers and other thought leaders across the country can help Asian American communities obtain improved access to mental health services.

Read more

American Indian Issues

by

Following the widely reported maltreatment of two indigenous students on a college campus visit last year, the American Indian College Fund initiated a collaborative project that has produced a study recommending ways to improve access, inclusion and equity for Native students seeking higher education.

Read more
by Lois Elfman

Building a supportive network is crucial for Native American scholars, many of whom are the only scholars in their field at a college or university.

Read more
by

The education of Native American youth was part of the charter when Dartmouth College opened its stately doors two and a half centuries ago. But it wasn’t until recent years that the school began graduating indigenous students in significant numbers, and its Native American Studies program has emerged as one of the strongest in the United States.

Read more

Why the Nation Needs to Do College Attainment Better

On June 18, 2018, Diverse: Issues In Higher Education partnered with Educational Testing Service (ETS) and American Council on Education for a lively panel moderated by Diverse executive editor Dr. Jamal Eric Watson titled “Why the Nation Needs to Do College Attainment Better.”

Read more