Higher Education News and Jobs

NEWS ROUNDUP

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Dr. Javaune Adams-Gaston, senior vice president for student life at Ohio State University, has been named the next  president at Norfolk State University, a historically Black college and university located in Virginia. During her tenure at OSU, Adams-Gaston furthered the institution’s approach to the comprehensive student experience, co-curricular plan and involvement opportunities, such as the […]

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by Tiffany Pennamon and LaMont Jones

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) has affirmed the agency’s December decision to terminate the accreditation of Bennett College, a historically Black College in Greensboro, N.C.

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When Dr. Betty N. Adams’ father told her she would “make a good nurse,” it greatly influenced a child who already had demonstrated a commitment to helping other people, particularly those who were sick.

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Community Colleges have to be more proactive in tackling the financial, housing and food insecurities that their students face. That was the message throughout this year’s Achieving the Dream (ATD) conference, which brought together faculty, administrators and students to discuss some of the most pressing problems facing community college students across the nation.

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As she prepares to retire as dean of the School of Nursing at Stony Brook University this spring, Dr. Lee Anne Xippolitos reflects on a health care career that spans almost two decades.

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Madeline Tondi found her passion for filmmaking at California State University, Los Angeles, where the undergraduate program she is on the verge of completing has received a large grant to increased diversity in the industry and advance film as a vehicle for social change.

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by Melanie Eversley

Against a backdrop of young people who communicate in fewer words and more pictures, and with young people of color continuing to avoid study abroad more than their counterparts, about 600 educators, students and administrators came together Sunday through Tuesday to share ways to promote and boost global education.

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VIEWS >>

Grambling State University: Where Students Are CELEBRATED, Not Tolerated

by Robert T. Palmer & Janelle L. Williams

About 5 years ago, researchers studying Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) concluded that enrollment among Black students at these institutions was on the decline. In fact, a report released by the Center for Minority Serving Institutions (CMSI) at the University of Pennsylvania revealed that since the 1980s, the number of Black students enrolling at HBCUs had steadily decreased while the population of non-Black students gradually increased.

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Helping Hands

In this issue: Nursing deans work to inspire a new generation of health care professionals.


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Publish or Perish: How to Rid Yourself of Fear

Publish or Perish: How to Rid Yourself of Fear

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Recently, my colleague Dr. Raquel Wright-Mair at the University of Northern Colorado virtually invited me to guess lecture in her graduate course regarding my op-eds. It is always an honor to share space with colleagues and students across the nation. A graduate student in her course posed a question that I have been reflecting on for the last several days. The student asked, “Do you have fear when it comes to writing these opinion pieces?” Fear and writing go hand in hand in all that we do in academia.

The Fallacy of NOT Seeing Race

The Fallacy of NOT Seeing Race

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Over the last two weeks I’ve listened to friends, pundits and scholars debate the implications of discovering yearbook photos of Virginia’s Governor and Attorney General proudly wearing Blackface. These revelations are more complicated than dismissing them as youthful indiscretions that were simply apropos of the time.

University of Farmington Sting Hurts Higher Ed More Than It Solves Immigration Crisis

University of Farmington Sting Hurts Higher Ed More Than It Solves Immigration Crisis

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Harvard’s motto is “Veritas,” which is Latin for “truth.” Plain. Simple. And nothing like the University of Farmington which used as its signature, “Scientia et Labor.” Only with the U of F, there definitely was no truth there, no science, no labor nor even an actual University of Farmington campus in Michigan.

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is planning on asking lawmakers to approve a proposal that would give on-campus child care services for single parents enrolled at community colleges throughout the state. If approved, the proposal would establish the Family Empowerment Community College Pilot program for up to 400 community college students, according to ABC-affiliate station […]

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Achieving the Dream is teaming up with the Biden Foundation to spearhead a bold, new initiative called “Community College Women Succeed,” aimed at helping adult women learners — including single parents — succeed and complete community college.

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There’s a lot of important legislative and policy change afoot in higher education in 2019, and community colleges leaders should make sure they have seats at every table and voices in very discussion. That’s been a key message this week at the Community College National Legislative Summit presented by the Association of Community College Trustees.

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by Lydia Lum

Launched in 2014, the initiative aims to diversify the legal profession by targeting members of historically underrepresented populations, which make up sizeable segments of community college enrollment.

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by Yves Salomon-Fernández

As a community college, our student body is diverse. It reflects the real world. As part of my first year efforts to see our college through our students’ eyes, at the end of last semester, we held a forum where students shared their thoughts on what started as age diversity on campus. The students communicated how much they treasure what we, educators, see as valuable and a unique advantage afforded to them because they are completing the first two years of their undergraduate degree at a community college.

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Black Issues

by Melanie Eversley

Against a backdrop of young people who communicate in fewer words and more pictures, and with young people of color continuing to avoid study abroad more than their counterparts, about 600 educators, students and administrators came together Sunday through Tuesday to share ways to promote and boost global education.

Read more
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Preeminent scholar Dr. Carter G. Woodson has been dubbed “the father of Black history” and is known for earning degrees at the University of Chicago and Harvard, but less well known is how living in Appalachia and attending Berea College informed his towering intellect and tireless work ethic.

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by Pearl Stewart

The “idea of materiality” intrigues Dr. Whitney Battle-Baptiste as do current issues of race, gender and class. As an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Battle-Baptiste combines these interests, describing herself as “a contemporary archaeologist.”

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Latino Issues

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The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has announced the launch of a new fellowship program that seeks to increase the number of Hispanic leaders in presidential positions across higher education.

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Research has shown that having role-models and mentors who share racial/ethnic identities can contribute to an individual’s self-concept of pursuing similar careers. Too often, people from underrepresented racial or ethnic communities hear about the struggles their community faces, rather than their increasing growth and success in this country.

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Being intentional about recruiting and serving Latino students, cultivating a familial community on campus and using data to implement and tailor student support initiatives were some of the strategies discussed during Excelencia in Education’s Accelerating Latino Student Success (ALASS) Institute on Friday.

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Asian American Issues

by Lois Elfman

Now in his second year as an assistant professor at Franklin & Marshall College, Dr. Mark Redondo Villegas is propelling students and colleagues to explore issues of race and identity.

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Cilantro is a good example for showing the stupidity of racial stereotypes. The herb, also known as coriander and Chinese parsley, is a staple in some cuisines to the surprise of diners of varying backgrounds who report it tastes like soap. It turns out that whether you like this seasoning or want to spit it out depends on your genetics — your heritage.

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by Lydia Lum

A new report lists multiple ways in which lawmakers and other thought leaders across the country can help Asian American communities obtain improved access to mental health services.

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American Indian Issues

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Following the widely reported maltreatment of two indigenous students on a college campus visit last year, the American Indian College Fund initiated a collaborative project that has produced a study recommending ways to improve access, inclusion and equity for Native students seeking higher education.

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by Lois Elfman

Building a supportive network is crucial for Native American scholars, many of whom are the only scholars in their field at a college or university.

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The education of Native American youth was part of the charter when Dartmouth College opened its stately doors two and a half centuries ago. But it wasn’t until recent years that the school began graduating indigenous students in significant numbers, and its Native American Studies program has emerged as one of the strongest in the United States.

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Why the Nation Needs to Do College Attainment Better

On June 18, 2018, Diverse: Issues In Higher Education partnered with Educational Testing Service (ETS) and American Council on Education for a lively panel moderated by Diverse executive editor Dr. Jamal Eric Watson titled “Why the Nation Needs to Do College Attainment Better.”

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