Higher Education News and Jobs


NEWS ROUNDUP

by Lois Elfman

As public safety and community well-being come under scrutiny, the scholarship of Dr. Eric L. Piza, associate professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, provides insight into policing and alternative approaches to public safety as well as evidence-based solutions.

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by Lois Elfman

As public safety and community well-being come under scrutiny, the scholarship of Dr. Eric L. Piza, associate professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, provides insight into policing and alternative approaches to public safety as well as evidence-based solutions.

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As a child of Vietnam War refugees, Dr. Soua Xiong always wanted to make his parents proud. To do so, he sought the route of higher education in hopes of being able to financially support his family. 

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Higher education leaders from across the country gathered to participate in the first day of the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ (AAC&U) 2021 Virtual Meeting.

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by Diverse Staff

A Q&A with Dr. Dana Hollie, the Faculty Athletic Representative at the University of Toledo.

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Dr. M. Lee Pelton, the 12th president of Boston’s Emerson College, will be leaving his role at the end of May, marking an end to decades of work in higher education. His next step: leading The Boston Foundation as CEO and president.

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by Lois Elfman

Low-income students are particularly hard hit as people cancel or reduce postsecondary plans. An analysis from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce (CEW), titled “When Back to School Meets Stay at Home,” noted that 75% of households in which at least one person intended to take postsecondary classes changed their plans. Some opted not to take any classes (37%) and some reduced their course load or changed programs, institutions or format.

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Inaugural Week and Poetry Should Re-Kindle Our Sense of Diversity

Inaugural Week and Poetry Should Re-Kindle Our Sense of Diversity

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As we celebrate the MLK holiday, the inaugural and the final days of the last four years, the assault on our norms should finally be coming to an end. The gaslight soon extinguished, let’s rekindle our sense of diversity to guide us over a more soothing, less bumpy political landscape.

Recalling an Affirmative Gesture

Recalling an Affirmative Gesture

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The college radio station is where I learned to be me. Maybe that’s because the radio audience doesn’t really see me. I was just a voice. Just like on the page or screen, the words are my voice through you. So you don’t instantly reject them. They could be your thoughts.  But listening to me is like me actually getting inside your ear. It’s more passively invasive. And then it all works on your imagination.

The Rich Get Richer in the Midst of a Pandemic

The Rich Get Richer in the Midst of a Pandemic

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In order to stay above water, institutions are making drastic decisions – implementing hiring freezes and pay cuts, trimming personnel via furloughs and layoffs, and leaving several employees without cost-of-living adjustments for the foreseeable future. Yet, in the midst of these decisions, I can’t help but notice how certain individuals seem to avoid economic losses – or take only minimal losses to save face.

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Dr. Adrienne Grayson entered the field of higher education with a goal of helping students have a positive college experience. Her interest in student affairs stemmed from being an Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) tutor and holding several related jobs during her undergraduate years at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). 

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Dr. DeAnna R. Burt-Nanna, who was recently appointed president of Monroe Community College (MCC), has always found education to be “inherit” in her genes.

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A beloved Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCCC) professor who died this year has left nearly $1 million for the college to use as scholarships for students in technology. Clifford F. Miller, who joined LCCC to teach mechanical technology in 1968, was among the first professors at the Pennsylvania college founded just two years prior. Miller […]

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With President-elect Joe Biden preparing to take office in January, this might be community colleges’ big moment. The institutions’ advocates are already celebrating what a Joe Biden presidency could mean for the community college sector.

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by John Roueche

While we know that hard work and persistence are essential to success, we also know that opportunity and access are the true keys to student persistence and achievement. The modern community college was established in all states following passage of the GI Bill, which resulted in hundreds of thousands of vets entering American higher education […]

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Black Issues

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Morgan State University President Dr. David K. Wilson has offered Amanda Gorman, the poet who penned and recited a poem at Joe Biden’s inauguration, a job as the HBCU’s poet-in-residence, The Baltimore Sun reported. “Ms. Gorman, I need you as our Poet-in-Residence at the National Treasure, @MorganStateU,” Wilson tweeted after Gorman performed her original poem, […]

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The Maryland General Assembly is again attempting to get the state to settle a lawsuit by its historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), which claim that higher ed policy has impeded the schools and instead has given advantages to historically White schools for decades, The Baltimore Sun reported. U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake ruled in […]

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The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF) has launched a training program and scholarship fund for aspiring civil rights lawyers seeking to fight racism in the U.S. South. The Marshall-Motley Scholars Program (MMSP) is meant to support 50 civil rights attorneys-in-training – including full law school scholarships, summer internships, post-grad fellowships – over […]

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Asian American Issues

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The college radio station is where I learned to be me. Maybe that’s because the radio audience doesn’t really see me. I was just a voice. Just like on the page or screen, the words are my voice through you. So you don’t instantly reject them. They could be your thoughts.  But listening to me is like me actually getting inside your ear. It’s more passively invasive. And then it all works on your imagination.

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John A. Logan College canceled all planned diversity activities last week, citing concerns that the school could lose federal funding if it violates President Donald Trump’s Sept. 22 executive order, which prohibits workforce diversity trainings that are “offensive and anti-American race and sex stereotyping and scapegoating,” FOX 28 reported. According to college officials, they “will […]

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UC San Diego will run a new program in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies starting in the fall, according to university officials. It will offer UC San Diego’s first minor in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies. The program is in the Institute of Arts and Humanities, where 14 other programs – including African […]

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Latino Issues

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In her role at the California-based education non-profit Education Trust-West, Yvonne Muñoz attempts to help support students of color and low-income students, with the added background of having lived and persevered through the experiences that these students now face.

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Dr. Miguel Cardona, Connecticut’s education commissioner, has emerged as President-elect Joe Biden’s top pick for U.S. secretary of education.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to impact businesses, schools and daily life in a number of ways.
It has also further exposed inequities that existed in society, given that a disproportionately high percentage of deaths related to COVID-19 in the U.S. have occurred among minority populations.

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American Indian Issues

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A new University of Minnesota initiative seeks to reckon with the school’s tumultuous history with tribal nations and teach people about racial justice, Star Tribune reported. The Minnesota Transform initiative will work with Black, Indigenous and immigrant people to present stories, “revitalize” Indigenous languages and report – together with the tribes – on the school’s […]

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Indigenous scholars are celebrating President-elect Joe Biden’s nomination of U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland for secretary of the interior. A Democratic Congresswoman from New Mexico, Haaland would be the first Native American in the position.

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The Institute of American Indian Arts is now running the second of two virtual exhibits featuring seniors’ artwork, called “Virtual Reservation.” It’s a collaboration between faculty, IT staff and students using software from Ortelia Interactive, an Australian company.

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