Higher Education News and Jobs


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The overwhelming majority of undergraduates aged 18 to 24 and their families (89%) still believe a college degree opens doors despite the hefty cost, according to the 2021 survey “How America Pays for College” from student loan lender Sallie Mae.

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To discuss best practices of selected pipeline programs, Drs. Curtis D. Byrd and Rihana S. Mason collaborated with SAGE Publishing to commence a three-part webinar series.

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Using firsthand accounts and perspectives, a new study examines how the events of this past year have impacted Black education at a national level.

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On Wednesday, the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE) partnered with the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) to focus on the goal of achieving justice, equity, and inclusion at colleges and universities across the nation.

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To mitigate the negative impact of implicit bias, specifically in college financial aid offices, the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) published the “Implicit Bias Toolkit.” The toolkit offers best practices to financial aid administrators to address biases in policies related to institutional forms, communication, cost of attendance, scholarship, student worker programs, verification and professional judgment.

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Dr. M. Christopher Brown II—once a rising star in academe— resigned on Tuesday as president of Kentucky State University, amid an ongoing financial probe. 

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CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Leading by Example

In this issue: Florida Polytechnic University's Dr. Grisselle Centeno works to encourage more women to opt for STEM careers.


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The Transferrable Impact of Positive Pressure in Sports and Public Policy

The Transferrable Impact of Positive Pressure in Sports and Public Policy

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There is a heightened level of immersion and focus that goes into what coaches do every day because the stakes are higher. With higher stakes comes more pressure. Pressure one of the main elements that leads to top level performance on a consistent basis. A lack of pressure leads to complacency which is the enemy of the maximization of one’s potential and purpose.

The Violence of Academia Helped Me See One Thing Clearly

The Violence of Academia Helped Me See One Thing Clearly

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I have spent a lot of time reflecting on life and death, for a few reasons. Around this time last year my mother almost died in a car accident. The year prior my dad nearly passed away, having to have back-to-back brain surgeries. In the past few years, multiple loved ones have died. Many of these lives I have yet to even grieve. Ironically, this time period was the peak of when I became most acquainted with academia’s violence.

NCAA Name, Image, and Likeness Policy Change Ushers in a New Paradigm

NCAA Name, Image, and Likeness Policy Change Ushers in a New Paradigm

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The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adoption of a new policy on July 1 that allowed players to be able to profit from their name, image, and likeness (NIL), has ushered in a new era for college athletics. It is an inflection point that will create a new paradigm that multiple stakeholders will have to adjust to. It represents a major deviation from a status quo that has been in place for generations. Players will now be able to cash in on the fame that the platform of college sports provides for the first time.

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California Community Colleges Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley will temporarily advise U.S. Education Secretary Dr. Miguel Cardona on higher education policy, reports The Los Angeles Times. Oakley will step aside from his role on July 26 and return this fall, with Deputy Chancellor Daisy Gonzales filling in the position. In helping the Biden administration achieve its […]

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Rural colleges and Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) could be strengthened by federal and statewide efforts to make broadband connection a telecommunications utility, through better funding, and more support for student’s basic mental health care needs. That’s the findings of the Association of Community College Trustees (AACT), who spent 18 months researching the issue at hundreds of institutions across the nation. 

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by Dr. Monica D. Wiggins and Dr. George R. Boggs

COVID-19 has demonstrated that technology is a bridge to sustaining a degree of normalcy in our lives. Institutions were able to switch almost overnight to online instruction and services only because of advances in technology, showing how critical having prepared professionals to address world problems is. According to the 2021 study “Women Chief Technology Officers in Community Colleges” by Monica D. Wiggins, the prevalence of technology today requires skilled technology workers — more than ever before — to secure, design, maintain and upgrade an ever-increasing number of advanced technological devices and programs. 

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Student housing at community colleges is somewhat rare — only 28% of community colleges in America have on-campus dormitory options for their students. But the last twenty years have seen a growing number of community colleges try to find creative ways to help their students who are housing or food insecure.

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Higher ed telehealth provider TimelyMD is launching a service this fall so that community college students have access to affordable support programs for basic needs. Such basic needs include medical and mental health care, food, housing, childcare, transportation and bill pay. The service will connect students to free or reduced-cost support programs for these needs. […]

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Black Issues

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A merger of these two seemingly disparate institutions— policing and HBCUs— has raised the ire of some Black activists and academics, particularly in the wake of the string of killings of unarmed Black men and women and calls to defund the police.

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Using firsthand accounts and perspectives, a new study examines how the events of this past year have impacted Black education at a national level.

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Gloria Richardson, “an influential yet largely unsung civil rights pioneer,” has died at age 99 in New York City, reports The Associated Press. By organizing the the Cambridge Movement on Maryland’s Eastern Shore in 1962, Richardson became the first woman to lead a prolonged grassroots civil rights movement outside of the Deep South. The movement […]

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Asian American Issues

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New research revealed “no strong evidence” to support claims that Asian American applicants are discriminated against during the admissions process at selective institutions.

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In an unusual request, the United States Supreme Court has asked for the Biden administration’s opinion on whether it should take up the case of Harvard University’s use of race in undergraduate admissions.

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Why is the Supreme Court balking on the Harvard affirmative action case? It’s a bad case if you want to get rid of affirmative action. At least ethically and logically.  Racists can get rid of it for any reason they want.  But we’re talking about the black robes of SCOTUS here.

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Latino Issues

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An “internationally recognized pioneer” in the field of Dominican women’s studies, Dr. Daisy Cocco De Filippis has been appointed president of Eugenio María de Hostos Community College in the Bronx, part of The City University of New York (CUNY) system. Having served as interim president of Hostos since August 2020, Cocco De Filippis is the […]

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Mishaela Durán has been appointed president and CEO of The Forum for Youth Investment, effective Sept. 7. Durán is a senior executive on the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Administration for Children and Families’ leadership team. Durán previously served as chief of staff at the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation. “I […]

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Excelencia in Education has received $10 million from philanthropists MacKenzie Scott and husband Dan Jewett, the largest gift in the organization’s history. “Excelencia is Ensuring America’s Future and engaging institutions whose leaders are ready to transform to intentionally SERVE Latino students,” said Sarita Brown, Excelencia co-founder and president. “We are energized to receive a gift […]

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American Indian Issues

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With searches of federal archives and newspaper records underway for two former indigenous boarding  schools in Colorado, Fort Lewis College (FLC) in Durango says it is considering a search for the remains of indigenous children on its campus, reports 9NEWS. The news comes after a tragic discovery in Canada earlier this year when a team […]

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The University of Virginia’s statue of Revolutionary War figure George Rogers Clark was removed from its campus, following the City of Charlottesville’s removal of two Confederate statues and one of Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and Sacagawea, reports the university’s student newspaper The Cavelier Daily. Erected in 1921, “the statue depicts Clark on horseback with a crew behind […]

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Emory University announced this week that it will be making several plans to reconcile with its racially fraught past, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. One of these plans include the renaming of several buildings. Emory will rename Language Hall on its Oxford College in honor of the late Horace J. Johnson Jr., who became the first […]

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