Parents Suing Consultant for Failing to Get Sons into Ivy League School - Higher Education

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Parents Suing Consultant for Failing to Get Sons into Ivy League School

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by Associated Press

BOSTON — A couple from Hong Kong has sued a U.S.-based college admissions consultant for failing to get their two sons into an Ivy League university as he had allegedly promised.

Gerald and Lily Chow say in their suit filed in U.S. District Court in Boston that they gave Mark Zimny more than $2 million to get their sons into an elite American university, preferably Harvard.

Zimny is a former Harvard professor who ran the education consultancy group IvyAdmit Consulting LLC.

The Boston Globe reports that the Chows say they gave $2.2 million to Zimny, who said he had contacts at Harvard and would funnel donations from the Chows to elite colleges.

They charge Zimny with fraud and breach of contract. They want their money back.

Zimny denied the allegations in court papers.

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