Program to Pay Tuition Cost for 2-year Degree - Higher Education

Higher Education News and Jobs

Program to Pay Tuition Cost for 2-year Degree

Email




by Associated Press

NASHVILLE Tenn.—Graduating high school seniors will be able to attend a community college tuition-free thanks to a program that’s expanding to Davidson County.

Gov. Bill Haslam and Nashville Mayor Karl Dean announced the program at a press conference on Monday.

The public-private partnership is an expansion of a larger initiative that provides scholarships to students in 26 other Tennessee counties.

Officials say the program helps students who may not be able to pay tuition but want to further their education at a community or technical institution.

So far, supporters have raised $1 million to launch the program in all 20 Nashville high schools, and the city is proposing up to $750,000 for the program over the next two years. The program also has a component that provides mentors for students.

Haslam said the program ties in with his “Drive to 55” initiative that’s intended to increase the number of Tennesseans with at least a two-year college degree or certificate.

Currently, 32 percent of Tennesseans have a two-year degree or higher, and Haslam’s goal is to raise that number to 55 percent by 2025.

The governor said the new education initiative in Nashville will also help attract businesses to the Music City.

“There’s a synergy to it,” he told reporters after the press conference. “The better graduates we produce, then the more businesses are going to say we want to be here.”

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Scholars: Fisher Decision Gives Colleges ‘Breathing Room’ to Consider Race in Admissions In a long-awaited decision hailed as a victory for college diversity but which critics assailed as a harmful to its intended beneficiaries, the Supreme Court on Thursday decided — 4 to 3 — to uphold the use of race-conscious affirmative action in col...
Education Management Corp. Lays Off 3 Percent of Workforce PITTSBURGH ― Pittsburgh-based Education Management Corp. has laid off hundreds of employees at Art Institute campuses across the country, including 41 in the city. The 3 percent reduction in the corporation’s workforce comes as the for-profit coll...
Big Accreditor of For-profit Colleges Could Lose Authority WASHINGTON ― A vote by an advisory panel to the Education Department could set the nation’s largest accreditor of for-profit colleges firmly on a path to closing its doors, potentially leaving hundreds of thousands of students at risk of losing acces...
Vermont Tech President to Step Down, Lead Nonprofit RANDOLPH, Vt. ― The president of Vermont Technical College is stepping down to lead a nonprofit. Dan Smith, who’s been president since 2014, will step down in August. He’s leaving to become president and CEO of the Vermont Community Foundation,...
Semantic Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *