University of Kansas Tuition Rates Frozen for Four Years - Higher Education

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University of Kansas Tuition Rates Frozen for Four Years

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by Associated Press

TOPEKA Kan.

Incoming freshman at the University of Kansas will pay the same tuition rate for four years under a plan the Kansas Board of Regents approved Thursday.

Under the plan, which takes effect in the fall, tuition rates at the University of Kansas will increase nearly 16 percent over current levels, then stay at that rate for four years.

“Parents so far are liking it because they know what the rate is,” said Todd Cohen, a university spokesman.

For other state universities, the regents approved a 7.9 percent increase in tuition and fees for in-state students at Kansas State; 6.4 percent at Wichita State; 9.5 percent at Emporia State; 7.1 percent at Pittsburg State; and 5.1 percent at Fort Hays State.

Under the University of Kansas plan, in-state freshman enrolled in 16 credit hours, which is considered full-time, will pay a total of $3785.75 per semester for tuition and campus fees. Out-of-state students will pay $9337.75 per semester.

The total doesn’t include course fees, which aren’t charged of students in all majors or for the full four years.

The tuition freeze is intended to encourage students to graduate on time. The school said all but four undergraduate programs can be completed in four years if students average 16 credit hours a semester.

School officials have estimated it would cost students who take more than four years to complete a bachelor’s degree an extra $1,000 per semester.

To protect against inflation, school officials have said they will ask for a new tuition rate for each incoming freshman class.

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The plan also gives first-time freshman the option of paying a fixed rate for student housing for two years.

And the plan sets course fees four years in advance for all students subject to them. The university also is working to establish a four-year schedule of campus fees. The required fees, which are set at $377.75 for the fall semester, support the student health center, the fitness and recreation center and other services.

Returning and transfer students will pay the standard tuition rate. For in-state undergraduate students, the standard rate will be $194.80 per credit hour, up from $183.75 the previous academic year. The standard rate will be less than the $213-per-credit-hour cost that incoming, resident freshmen will pay.

Christine Downey-Schmidt, the newly elected chairwoman of the Board of Regents, noted the challenging fiscal environment.

“However,” she said in a news release, “innovative cost-containment proposals such as KU’s tuition compact are certainly refreshing, and I’m anxious to see how students benefit from this plan in the coming years.”

On the Net:

Kansas Board of Regents: http://www.kansasregents.org

University of Kansas: http://www.tuition.ku.edu/

–Associated Press



© Copyright 2005 by DiverseEducation.com

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