Money Woes Forcing Oregon to Alter Community College Promise - Higher Education


Higher Education News and Jobs

Money Woes Forcing Oregon to Alter Community College Promise

Email




by Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Promise may not be kept to students from wealthier families.

The program approved by lawmakers two years ago allows students to attend community college for nearly free, after scholarships and grants are subtracted from the tuition bill.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports lawmakers have budgeted $40 million for the program over the next two years – $8 million less than officials say is needed to pay for it. The state might cut off grants to students from wealthier families to make up the difference.

An education subcommittee met Wednesday and approved the proposal to restrict certain families from qualifying.

The potential changes come days before the state’s July 3 application deadline for students looking to enroll for the fall term. More than 13,800 recent high school graduates and GED recipients have already submitted applications.

“This will create significant hardships for some students whose college plans were premised on getting this award and who will find out this summer that they don’t receive it,” said Ben Cannon, executive director of the state Higher Education Coordinating Commission.

Though nothing is finalized, the state estimates the policy shift could apply to 1 out of every 6 applicants.

Roughly 20 percent of current promise students come from families with median adjusted gross income of $111,603 or greater, according to state records.

The Oregon Promise is currently available to students with at least a 2.5 grade point average who filled out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid application and graduated from high school within the past six months.

  GOP Tax Bill Draws Bitter Criticism

“It’s attracted way more students than we originally budgeted for, which is a good thing, but it costs more,” said Sen. Rod Monroe, D-Portland.

RELATED ARTICLES >>
Accessibility Is Hallmark of Vargas Presidency Kendall Basham, who graduated in May 2017 from Southeast Missouri State University, always had been an admirer of the university president, Dr. Carlos Vargas-Aburto. To surprise Basham on her birthday, Dylan Kennedy, a senior and vice president of So...
UCLA Course to Examine Race Through Lens of Black Horror Films, Literature Tananarive Due is bringing a highly anticipated Get Out-inspired course to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) this semester. Tananarive Due The “The Sunken Place: Racism, Survival and Black Horror Aesthetic” course is based on di...
Innovative Strategies for HBCUs Proposed at CBC Conference WASHINGTON — A range of solutions and strategies — from the adoption of new business models to one-on-one mentoring from African Americans who’ve attained C-Suite positions — emerged Thursday at the inaugural HBCU “braintrust” of the Congressional Bl...
Brigham Young University Ends Ban on Caffeinated Soda Sales SALT LAKE CITY — Mormon church-owned Brigham Young University ended a six-decade ban Thursday on the sale of caffeinated soft drinks on campus, surprising students by posting a picture of a can of Coca-Cola on Twitter and just two words: “It’s happen...
Semantic Tags: