Higher Education News and Jobs

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In a new report, Excelencia in Education analyzed how Hispanic Serving Institutions, which enroll over 65% of Latinx students, are strategically planning for workforce success.

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by B. Denise Hawkins

She couldn’t say no. “Higher education,” Mishoe says, “is my natural habitat,” and Delaware State has always been her home. Mishoe returned to historic landmarks still standing tall and took comfort in seeing some of the same trees that stood on campus 50 years ago, throwing off shade like old friends.

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by Pearl Stewart

In 2001, Judith Ramaley, a director at the National Science Foundation, coined the acronym STEM for education disciplines in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Since then, NSF and other public and private entities have provided numerous grants and incentives to support initiatives for STEM diversity in education. However, almost two decades later, diversity among STEM faculty remains inadequate. Only 10.1% of STEM faculty is from underrepresented minorities, according to an NSF-funded report from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.

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by Lois Elfman

A new report shows that more than 40% of colleges and universities are expecting to see significant decreases in fundraising in the months and years ahead due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Last month, Dr. Charlene Dukes, president of Prince George’s County Community College in Maryland since 2007, retired after serving more than 40 years within the higher education sector. Her ability to connect with low-income and first-generation college students was informed by the fact that she was one herself. 

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From hosting the first R&B radio show in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to establishing her own consulting business, Shaashawn S. Dial, director of diversity, equity and inclusion at Stephens College, has undergone several career changes. However, higher education was an area that she always returned to.

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CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Standing in the Gap

In this issue: Minority health practitioners key to remedying racial disparities laid bare by COVID-19.


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The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. Revisited in ‘The Sword and The Shield’

The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. Revisited in ‘The Sword and The Shield’

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As the nation witnesses around-the-clock Black Lives Matter protests, Dr. Peniel E. Joseph’s ‘The Sword and The Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.’ could not have been published at a more apropos time. 

How “Different” Will Post-COVID Higher Education Be, Especially for “At-Risk” Students?

How “Different” Will Post-COVID Higher Education Be, Especially for “At-Risk” Students?

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How are institutions preparing to deal with access to technology issues? While I can imagine many institutions providing students with laptops, students may encounter barriers to accessing reliable internet or even power for their devices. For residential campuses specifically who will have many students stay home, how do you ensure that your low-income students have access to adequate working space to learn and study?

How and Where We Exit: Seven Propositions on Black Positionalities in the Pandemics Era

How and Where We Exit: Seven Propositions on Black Positionalities in the Pandemics Era

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The world has tried to recalibrate after the seismic shift that the COVID-19 pandemic has exacted on key aspects of everyday life, as we once knew it. For certain populations, this shift has been coupled with a cataclysmic jolt. For Black people globally, and specifically for African-Americans in the United States, the battle has been at best—formidable. While the Black gaze focused on the destruction and devastation that COVID-19 was exacting, it was the concomitant spread of a second pandemic, racism, which proved to be just as, if not even more virulent for the Black community.

The Minnesota College Athletic Conference, which consists of 24 two-year colleges located in Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, has decided to cancel all junior college contact sports for the fall due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The conference said its decision is in line with the guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and […]

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Last month, Dr. Charlene Dukes, president of Prince George’s County Community College in Maryland since 2007, retired after serving more than 40 years within the higher education sector. Her ability to connect with low-income and first-generation college students was informed by the fact that she was one herself. 

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Last month, in partnership with educational company StraighterLine, the Community College of Denver (CCD) launched CCD Academy, which provides an opportunity for students to return to college and work toward their degree at a low cost.

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by Pearl Stewart

During her 16-year tenure as the longest serving chancellor in the history of the San Diego Community College District, Dr. Constance Carroll has taken her leadership to a new level. She is known in her community as “the people’s chancellor,” and her track record supports that moniker. 

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Texas Woman’s University plans to expand its recently implemented joint nursing program to Alvin Community College’s campus, which reduces the overall time and cost needed to earn a nursing degree.

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Black Issues

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An online meeting of university leaders — co-hosted by the Steve Fund and the American Council on Education — explored how mental health resources for students of color should be incorporated into reopening plans.

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As the nation witnesses around-the-clock Black Lives Matter protests, Dr. Peniel E. Joseph’s ‘The Sword and The Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.’ could not have been published at a more apropos time. 

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by Robert T. Palmer and Larry J. Walker

The protests occurring in many cities in America to call attention to the systemic racism in society has provoked us to critically reflect on our experiences as Black men in this country. This cathartic process has led us to believe that as African Americans we are involuntarily mandated to pay a “Black tax.” This term is not new. In fact, it has been primarily associated with a family member who has advanced to a high socioeconomic status and who provides monetary support to other family members. Some have used this term to underscore the ways in which discrimination has impacted the financial standing of African Americans. Our conceptualization of the Black tax differs from the ways it has been used previously.

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Latino Issues

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In a new report, Excelencia in Education analyzed how Hispanic Serving Institutions, which enroll over 65% of Latinx students, are strategically planning for workforce success.

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by Lois Elfman

As Latino/Hispanic faculty associations strive to increase recruitment and retention, students are feeling the positive impact. Not only do faculty association events — both structured and informal — enable faculty members to connect and share their experiences, they also include opportunities to connect with students and expand the pipeline to new talent in the academy.

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California Rep. Nanette Barragán remembers her immigrant parents telling her, “Doctor or lawyer – that’s the only way you’re going to get out of poverty.” She shared the memory Wednesday at the third annual Latina Leaders Summit hosted by The Hill, which brought women together to discuss how policymakers can level the playing field for Latinas in politics, education and the workforce.

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Asian American Issues

by Yang Hu

“You brought the virus here.” These words were thrown at me on a street corner as I walked my dog, soon after the stay-at-home order was issued. Before I realized that these words were meant for me, the man who uttered them already moved on.

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Since the coronavirus crisis began in Wuhan, China, Asian and Asian American students have faced an increase in discrimination on U.S. campuses, as their classmates misplace blame for the pandemic. Months ago, students reported xenophobic remarks, pointed looks and avoidance from their peers. But even with classes moved online, they continue to deal with harassment.   

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Dr. Jan Padios — associate professor and director of graduate studies within the Department of American Studies at the University of Maryland (UMD) — holds a personal connection to her career research, which analyzes the historical and anticolonial aspects of the Philippines.

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American Indian Issues

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Senators Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Doug Jones (D-AL) on Thursday pressed for $1.5 billion in emergency funding to help historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority-serving institutions (MSIs) respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

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In the sciences, only 48 research doctorates were awarded to Native American and Alaska Native students, out of the 11,764 doctorates awarded to U.S. residents in 2012. The Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership supports Native American scholars pursuing graduate education in STEM disciplines.

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Through a partnership with the University of Wyoming (UW) and the Northern Arapaho Tribe, an immersion dual language school will be established for K-16 students to help save the Arapaho language from extinction.

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What You Can Do to Recruit and Retain Diverse Faculty and Staff During COVID-19

Don’t want all of your time, resources and efforts wasted on your previous diversity recruitment efforts? Join this webinar for COVID-19 specific guidelines and strategies to help ensure you continue and improve diversity recruitment efforts for faculty and staff, while maintaining your retention strategies that support your diverse faculty and staff and support the mission […]

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