Higher Education News and Jobs

NEWS ROUNDUP

by Pamela M. Norris

As we head into a new decade, we are tasked with preparing engineers and computer scientists to lead a transforming workforce. Ultimately, employers will search for workers who thrive on multi-disciplinary teams that prioritize collaboration and disruption. The question then becomes: How do we fill the need for a larger, higher-skilled engineering and technology workforce? We must widen the pipeline to include people from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields.

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Throughout this weekend and into the federal Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday on Monday, institutions of higher learning across the country will be celebrating the life and legacy of King, the noted civil rights leader.

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The Modern Language Association (MLA), founded in 1883, hosts one of the preeminent conferences for scholars of language and literature. Long known for its rigorous scholarship, overwhelming number of sessions and aura of anxiety from harried graduate students rushing to and from job interviews, the convention has undergone changes in recent years to be less stressful, more professional development-oriented and more inclusive.

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With the rise in tuition costs, Wake Forest University looked to develop an opportunity for all students to be able to attend the institution without the financial burden. The establishment of the Magnolia Scholars program created an opportunity for first-generation students to receive financial aid, mentorship and college transition assistance.

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by Lois Elfman

A new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce (CEW) examines how the degrees that liberal arts colleges confer have substantial returns on investment (ROI) in the long-term.

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Imposter syndrome describes the unfounded belief that one is unworthy of his or her accomplishments, and according to new research, first-generation college students are more likely to suffer from it. The study, published in Social Psychological and Personality Science, focused on a group of 818 freshmen and sophomore students pursuing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

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In response to a number of racist and bias-related incidents on Syracuse University’s campus, the university announced the establishment of the Board of Trustees Special Committee on University Climate, Diversity and Inclusion.

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VIEWS >>

How Can We Close the STEM Gender Gap Before Another Century Passes?

by Pamela M. Norris

As we head into a new decade, we are tasked with preparing engineers and computer scientists to lead a transforming workforce. Ultimately, employers will search for workers who thrive on multi-disciplinary teams that prioritize collaboration and disruption. The question then becomes: How do we fill the need for a larger, higher-skilled engineering and technology workforce? We must widen the pipeline to include people from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields.


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Un-Civil Rights: America’s Fear of Diversity in 2020

Un-Civil Rights: America’s Fear of Diversity in 2020

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Have the war protests started? Are your students beginning to wonder about military service and the importance of a draft? Our country’s constitutional crisis seems to be coming to a head as we deal with a president who insists he can do anything he wants.

Michigan Jury Sides With UM Over Professors of Color

Michigan Jury Sides With UM Over Professors of Color

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Is it a level playing field for professors of color in academia? Here’s a story that broke before Christmas that will make you question what it takes to prove discrimination.

The Price of Engagement

The Price of Engagement

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One aspect of being a graduate student that I will truly miss are the discounted membership and registration rates for professional and academic associations. I have benefited tremendously from the affordable rates and have been able to present research and network with colleagues throughout the nation. While I understand the need for a higher membership and conference registration rate for non-graduate students for the financial health of the organization, the unspoken truth of needing to engage in several of these organizations can quickly become costly.

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam proposed a plan to make community college free for residents from low- or middle-income backgrounds going into particular fields with skilled labor shortages in Virginia.

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Dr. Leah Barrett, recently named president of Northeast Community College in Norfolk, Nebraska, always saw herself as someone who was going to lead an organization. She has found her calling in the world of community colleges, despite working at four-year institutions for most of her career.

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by Lois Elfman

A recent report demonstrates that attending a community college increases the chance for low-income, underrepresented students to attend selective four-year institutions.

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Last week, Dr. Clyde Muse, president of Hinds Community College, announced his plans to retire June 30 after leading the school for 42 years. He is currently the longest-serving community college president in the state, according to the Mississippi Business Journal. Muse became president of the school in 1978. Prior to his role as Hinds […]

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by Pearl Stewart

Scholars and education policy analysts are questioning whether two-year institutions and the students they serve — especially those most in need — are actually benefiting from free tuition programs.

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Black Issues

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Humanities faculty discussed practical techniques for boosting academic diversity alongside broader national conversations about race and White supremacy as the four-day Modern Language Association (MLA) Convention drew to a close.

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Rice University recently promoted its dean of engineering, Dr. Reginald DesRoches, to the position of provost. DesRoches will be the university’s first African-American provost, a historic moment for the Texas campus, which didn’t enroll Black undergraduates until 1965, the Houston Chronicle reported. As dean, DesRoches opened the Center for Transforming Data to Knowledge, which gives […]

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The latest version of the FUTURE Act, a bipartisan compromise on funding for minority serving institutions, now awaits the signature of President Trump, having been passed by the House and Senate yesterday, hours after a United Negro College Fund press conference touted the bill’s merits.

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Latino Issues

by Lois Elfman

As Latino/Hispanic faculty associations strive to increase recruitment and retention, students are feeling the positive impact. Not only do faculty association events — both structured and informal — enable faculty members to connect and share their experiences, they also include opportunities to connect with students and expand the pipeline to new talent in the academy.

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California Rep. Nanette Barragán remembers her immigrant parents telling her, “Doctor or lawyer – that’s the only way you’re going to get out of poverty.” She shared the memory Wednesday at the third annual Latina Leaders Summit hosted by The Hill, which brought women together to discuss how policymakers can level the playing field for Latinas in politics, education and the workforce.

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Showcasing both the ingenuity and struggles of Latinx scholars in the academy, this year’s American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) conference focused on the future.

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Asian American Issues

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Racial nationalists, who equate ethnicity with belonging, can co-exist with each other. Their acceptance may be begrudging, but they can be sympathetic to one another’s sense of who should be where. They will avoid conflict if they stay in the appropriate place and don’t claim the same territory. It is those whose race and nationality do not correspond, or who are cosmopolitan, who threaten an order deemed natural

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by Jessica Fry

When I was a freshman in high school, I was walking to my geometry class for sixth period. A loud voice boomed down the hall, “Hey, Korean trash, go home!” In an almost exclusively White high school, I knew that the insult was being hurled at me.

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I have been studying the internment of Japanese Americans ever since I have been a professor. Yet I have had the most important insight, personally as an Asian American albeit not Japanese originally, only recently. To explain why the mass incarceration during World War II of 120,000 individuals on the basis of heritage, two-thirds of them native-born citizens of this nation, was wrong requires pointing out that the people who are most offended about the violation of civil rights are those who subscribe in the ideals of the United States.

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American Indian Issues

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In the sciences, only 48 research doctorates were awarded to Native American and Alaska Native students, out of the 11,764 doctorates awarded to U.S. residents in 2012. The Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership supports Native American scholars pursuing graduate education in STEM disciplines.

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Through a partnership with the University of Wyoming (UW) and the Northern Arapaho Tribe, an immersion dual language school will be established for K-16 students to help save the Arapaho language from extinction.

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Following the widely reported maltreatment of two indigenous students on a college campus visit last year, the American Indian College Fund initiated a collaborative project that has produced a study recommending ways to improve access, inclusion and equity for Native students seeking higher education.

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Critical Questions about the Relationships among Viewpoint Diversity and Other Aspects of Diversity

Dr. Jamal Watson, executive editor of Diverse: Issues In Higher Education moderates a panel discussion on Viewpoint Diversity at the Heterodox Academy conference in New York City. 

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