Higher Education News and Jobs

NEWS ROUNDUP

by

Radford University has internally disciplined a “classified staff employee” responsible for swiping some of the 1,000 missing copies of the university’s student-run newspaper The Tartan in September. The university has not identified the worker’s name, but Chief of Police David Underwood stated in a letter that the worker will not be charged criminally. In the […]

Read more
by

Dr. Araceli Frias, assistant dean for diversity in the Graduate School at the University of Utah, has been widely credited with expanding the University of Utah Graduate School Diversity Office’s reach.

Read more
by

High school students in a West Virginia county can now choose to start their college education a little earlier.In a partnership between BridgeValley Community and Technical College and Kanawha County School District, students would be given the opportunity to earn both a high school degree and associate degree simultaneously.

Read more
by Sammy G. Allen

Explaining the dual role of Black women as feminists and civil rights activists throughout American history was at the core of a symposium held on Friday that focused on the intersectionality of Women’s Studies and African American Studies at Prairie View A&M University.

Read more

by

“How to Be an Antiracist,” has catapulted Dr. Ibram X. Kendi — already a National Book Award winner, professor and founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University — to greater heights.

Read more
by Autumn A. Arnett

If you look at the data surrounding the Brew City, it is hard to believe Milwaukee is making any progress to move the needle at all on racial equity. The city has the highest Black-White segregation and the highest rate of incarceration of Black males in the country. The state of Wisconsin, anchored by the city of Milwaukee, has the worst Black-White achievement gap in the country as evidenced by National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores, a truth that has persisted for over 15 years.

Read more
by

Sen. Doug Jones and Sen. Jon Tester are making a renewed push for the U.S. Senate to pass the Fostering Undergraduate Talent by Unlocking Resources for Education (FUTURE) Act, bipartisan legislation – introduced by Jones and Sen. Tim Scott – to renew mandatory federal funds to minority serving institutions for two years.

Read more

VIEWS >>

Whitewashing Impeachment and 2020: Don’t Forget Who Got Us Here

by Micaela di Leonardo

Like the majority of Americans facing the new impeachment inquiry landscape, I am both jubilant and alarmed. What will happen now? Impeachment of a sitting president is a dead-serious business, with no predictable outcome.

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

The Face of Change

In this issue: University of Utah law school dean Elizabeth Kronk Warner makes history.


BLOG >>

“Color Blind” Is Not What It Seems

“Color Blind” Is Not What It Seems

by

Among the concepts the law has distorted is “color blindness.” When Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in 1963, before the Civil Rights Act was enacted, he popularized a phrase that has been invoked by those who have not shared his idealism.

Higher Ed’s Impeachment Role

Higher Ed’s Impeachment Role

by

Make no mistake, Higher Ed must play a role in impeachment. Not as partisans. But as the context makers. The fact-checkers. The knowledge filters.

Our Shared History

Our Shared History

by

People are ignorant of history, even their own.

by

New research from the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) found that postsecondary institutions are struggling to recruit students.

Read more
by

Two students were injured at Ellsworth Community College in Iowa after an electric outlet shortage started a fire in a men’s dorm on campus. The students were sent to the hospital from smoke inhalation but were released on the same day, the Des Moines Register reported. The dorm, Thompson Hall, will remain closed for two weeks. […]

Read more
by

Many higher education researchers and student-success advocates have long criticized no-credit remedial or developmental education in community colleges as a “trap” – an unintentional barrier to student success, particularly for its impact on low-income and minority students’ persistence and completion outcomes.

Read more
by

A new program at Rockland Community College in New York provides training courses for middle skills-level jobs that require a high school education but not necessarily a college degree. Career Skills Academy, previously known as Middle Skills Academy, has piloted four programs and is planning to debut three more this fall.

Read more
by Ángel Cabrera and Joelle Phillips

For over a third of American undergraduate students, pursuit of a college education begins at community college. Excellent community colleges propel students of all backgrounds into the middle class.

Read more

Black Issues

by Autumn A. Arnett

For the second year in a row, the International Colloquium on Black Males in Education kicked off by giving space to Black women in the academy to convene to discuss the challenges unique to Black women in a space that is overwhelmingly White and male.

Read more
by

New research found that an increase in applications and enrollment at one-third of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) over the past three years directly correlates to the current social and political climate created under President Donald J. Trump’s presidency.

Read more
by

A newly launched peer-review journal is scheduled to publish in Spring 2020 and will examine achievement, creativity, and leadership among gifted and high-achieving minority populations across the P-20 continuum.

Read more

Latino Issues

by Lois Elfman

As Latino/Hispanic faculty associations strive to increase recruitment and retention, students are feeling the positive impact. Not only do faculty association events — both structured and informal — enable faculty members to connect and share their experiences, they also include opportunities to connect with students and expand the pipeline to new talent in the academy.

Read more
by

California Rep. Nanette Barragán remembers her immigrant parents telling her, “Doctor or lawyer – that’s the only way you’re going to get out of poverty.” She shared the memory Wednesday at the third annual Latina Leaders Summit hosted by The Hill, which brought women together to discuss how policymakers can level the playing field for Latinas in politics, education and the workforce.

Read more
by

Showcasing both the ingenuity and struggles of Latinx scholars in the academy, this year’s American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) conference focused on the future.

Read more

Asian American Issues

by

Racial nationalists, who equate ethnicity with belonging, can co-exist with each other. Their acceptance may be begrudging, but they can be sympathetic to one another’s sense of who should be where. They will avoid conflict if they stay in the appropriate place and don’t claim the same territory. It is those whose race and nationality do not correspond, or who are cosmopolitan, who threaten an order deemed natural

Read more
by Jessica Fry

When I was a freshman in high school, I was walking to my geometry class for sixth period. A loud voice boomed down the hall, “Hey, Korean trash, go home!” In an almost exclusively White high school, I knew that the insult was being hurled at me.

Read more
by

I have been studying the internment of Japanese Americans ever since I have been a professor. Yet I have had the most important insight, personally as an Asian American albeit not Japanese originally, only recently. To explain why the mass incarceration during World War II of 120,000 individuals on the basis of heritage, two-thirds of them native-born citizens of this nation, was wrong requires pointing out that the people who are most offended about the violation of civil rights are those who subscribe in the ideals of the United States.

Read more

American Indian Issues

Following the widely reported maltreatment of two indigenous students on a college campus visit last year, the American Indian College Fund initiated a collaborative project that has produced a study recommending ways to improve access, inclusion and equity for Native students seeking higher education.

Read more
by Lois Elfman

Building a supportive network is crucial for Native American scholars, many of whom are the only scholars in their field at a college or university.

Read more

The education of Native American youth was part of the charter when Dartmouth College opened its stately doors two and a half centuries ago. But it wasn’t until recent years that the school began graduating indigenous students in significant numbers, and its Native American Studies program has emerged as one of the strongest in the United States.

Read more

Critical Questions about the Relationships among Viewpoint Diversity and Other Aspects of Diversity

Dr. Jamal Watson, executive editor of Diverse: Issues In Higher Education moderates a panel discussion on Viewpoint Diversity at the Heterodox Academy conference in New York City. 

Read more