Higher Education News and Jobs
by

As campaign season for the 2020 presidency begins with more women competing for the nomination than ever before, gender bias continues to affect their chances of political success, with 13 percent of Americans believing that men are more emotionally suited for political office than women.

Read more
by

Dr. Huey Copeland, an associate professor of art history and the Arthur Andersen Teaching and Research Professor at Northwestern University, has advanced scholarship in contemporary and modern art of the African diaspora like few others.

Read more
by Roscoe Nance

Baseball is a game played at a slow pace and is deliberate when it comes to changing the way it is played. The same can be said for Major League Baseball (MLB) and its racial and gender hiring practices.

Read more

by

Leaders from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) believe that it is a “moral imperative” for the institutions to further their support of the millions of students who show up at their campuses.

Read more
by Janet Kline

Morehouse College—the nation’s only historically Black all-men’s school in the nation—will begin admitting transgender students who identify as men in Fall 2020.

Read more
by

Faculty attitudes are beginning to shift around the use of open educational resources (OER), scholarly search engines such as Google Scholar and cloud-based data storage services, even though there is some divergence between their attitudes and actual behaviors in some areas. Those are a few findings from a recently released Ithaka S+R survey of nearly 11,000 faculty members at four-year institutions across the U.S.

Read more

VIEWS >>

Pain. Hurt. Betrayal.

by Claudia García-Louis

Pain. Hurt. Betrayal. How do these three little words burrow their way into our minds, body and soul? How is it possible that pain, hurt, betrayal became synonymous to the experiences of so many marginalized and minoritized scholars?

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

A Student-Centered President

In this issue: Dr. Kenneth Atwater is recognized as 2019 Diverse Champion.


BLOG >>

Yes Virginia, There is a Choice

Yes Virginia, There is a Choice

by

Like many other students of color who receive messages that they’re not good enough, I had resigned myself to believing that I was either unready or unprepared for college. As a first-generation student, I couldn’t rely on legacy status to give me a leg up in the admissions process and my family certainly couldn’t rely on making donations to athletic booster clubs or local alumni groups.

‘I Just Said That!’

‘I Just Said That!’

by

Have you ever had that moment when you were in a meeting and proposed an idea for consideration to solve a problem? In an instance, you are abruptly interrupted. Your colleague regurgitated your idea as if it was their own. As you look around the table for a connection of affirmation, in your head you are thinking, “I just said that!”

Defining Political Progress

Defining Political Progress

by

One of the things I love most about writing for Diverse is that it provides an opportunity for me to think through our increasingly complicated political space. Exploring the intersection of politics, pop culture and higher education also provides a platform to align pedagogy with public scholarship. I approach this column as I approach my classroom: my job isn’t to tell people how to think; but to provide them with information that encourages them to think critically and analytically.

by

Dr. Ken Atwater’s enthusiasm for community colleges is quite infectious. It’s apparent when you talk to administrators, faculty and some of the nearly 45,000 students at the five-campus Hillsborough Community College (HCC) where he serves as president.

Read more
by

The ways in which community colleges and other institutions structure their students’ learning experience through policy, pedagogy and practice can play a significant role in shaping students’ academic mindset, according to a new report released this week from the University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE).

Read more
by

Indian River State College (IRSC) and Miami Dade College (MDC), both in Florida, are the co-winners of this year’s 2019 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, a national recognition from the Aspen Institute highlighting their outstanding commitment to student success and equitable student outcomes amongst a pool of 1,000 community colleges across the country.

Read more
by

Around 80 percent of students in the United States end up changing their major at least once, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Those stats resonate with Jason Roscoe who didn’t know what career he wanted to pursue either, when he enrolled as an undergraduate at Mansfield University located in Pennsylvania.

Read more
by

West Virginia legislatures and post-secondary officials have expressed their support for recently passed Senate Bill 1, legislation that supporters say could open new economic opportunities and establish an industry talent pipeline in West Virgina’s community colleges. Lawmakers from both houses passed SB1 toward the end of a recent meeting, creating the West Virginia Invests Grant Program. […]

Read more

Black Issues

by

One of the things I love most about writing for Diverse is that it provides an opportunity for me to think through our increasingly complicated political space. Exploring the intersection of politics, pop culture and higher education also provides a platform to align pedagogy with public scholarship. I approach this column as I approach my classroom: my job isn’t to tell people how to think; but to provide them with information that encourages them to think critically and analytically.

Read more
by Melanie Eversley

Dr. Farah Griffin, is wearing two hats as the inaugural chair of Columbia’s new African-American and African Diaspora Studies Department and director-elect of Columbia’s Institute for Research in African-American Studies.

Read more
by Jamaal Abdul-Alim

If you’re in the habit of spewing negative statistics about the education of Black students in the United States, expect to draw the ire of Dr. Ivory A. Toldson.

Read more

Latino Issues

by

Showcasing both the ingenuity and struggles of Latinx scholars in the academy, this year’s American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) conference focused on the future.

Read more
by

The goal of the HSI Pathways program is to increase the number of Latino faculty in the humanities. Funded by a five-year, $5.1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the program is on track to prepare 90 students from Florida International University, the University of Texas El Paso and California State University, Northridge – all Hispanic serving institutions (HSIs) – for careers in academia.

Read more
by

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has announced the launch of a new fellowship program that seeks to increase the number of Hispanic leaders in presidential positions across higher education.

Read more

Asian American Issues

by Lois Elfman

Now in his second year as an assistant professor at Franklin & Marshall College, Dr. Mark Redondo Villegas is propelling students and colleagues to explore issues of race and identity.

Read more
by

Cilantro is a good example for showing the stupidity of racial stereotypes. The herb, also known as coriander and Chinese parsley, is a staple in some cuisines to the surprise of diners of varying backgrounds who report it tastes like soap. It turns out that whether you like this seasoning or want to spit it out depends on your genetics — your heritage.

Read more
by Lydia Lum

A new report lists multiple ways in which lawmakers and other thought leaders across the country can help Asian American communities obtain improved access to mental health services.

Read more

American Indian Issues

by

Following the widely reported maltreatment of two indigenous students on a college campus visit last year, the American Indian College Fund initiated a collaborative project that has produced a study recommending ways to improve access, inclusion and equity for Native students seeking higher education.

Read more
by Lois Elfman

Building a supportive network is crucial for Native American scholars, many of whom are the only scholars in their field at a college or university.

Read more
by

The education of Native American youth was part of the charter when Dartmouth College opened its stately doors two and a half centuries ago. But it wasn’t until recent years that the school began graduating indigenous students in significant numbers, and its Native American Studies program has emerged as one of the strongest in the United States.

Read more

Why the Nation Needs to Do College Attainment Better

On June 18, 2018, Diverse: Issues In Higher Education partnered with Educational Testing Service (ETS) and American Council on Education for a lively panel moderated by Diverse executive editor Dr. Jamal Eric Watson titled “Why the Nation Needs to Do College Attainment Better.”

Read more

Diverse Poll

Find the answer at our 35th Anniversary page 35diverse.com