Higher Education News and Jobs


NEWS ROUNDUP

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MSNBC’s Joy Reid is joining the Howard University faculty as a visiting professor in the Spring semester. Reid, who hosts “The Reid Out,” will teach a course titled, “Covering Race, Gender & Politics in the Digital Age,” and will hold the Hearst visiting professorship in the university’s Department of Media, Journalism and Film housed within […]

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A  recently published brief from the American Talent Initiative (ATI) is making the case for colleges and universities to enroll and support more student veterans.

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With a $2.5 million grant from the United States Department of Education-Office of Postsecondary, the University of New Hampshire is breaking down educational barriers for young adults with intellectual disabilities.

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Over the years, Dyersburg State Community College (DSCC) has worked to bring college courses inside prison walls. Most recently, after receiving $918,750 as part of Tennessee Governor Bill Lee’s Correctional Education Initiative, DSCC’s prison education efforts expanded to include West Tennessee State Penitentiary (WTSP) and the Women’s Therapeutic Residential Center. 

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Kami Chavis, associate provost and law professor at Wake Forest University, has been appointed vice provost for three years, continuing her three-year stay in the provost’s office.

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by B. Denise Hawkins

CRISPR is a new technique that involves cutting out a tiny piece of the mutation or defective gene that causes sickle cell disease in the hopes that the corrected gene will then work to make normal hemoglobin (a protein in red blood cells) instead of the sickle-shaped hemoglobin that gives the disease its name.

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by Autumn A. Arnett

The response to COVID-19 has been mixed this fall. Some campuses, like the Atlanta University Center institutions in Georgia and the entire California State University system, pulled back in-person instruction and moved totally online. Others moved forward with in-person instruction but found themselves having to scale back amenities and implement social distancing protocols on campus.

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CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Holding On Amid COVID-19

In this issue: Higher Ed Stakeholders working to meet mental health needs of students amid ongoing pandemic.


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HSI by Choice or By Circumstance: Examining R1 Hispanic Serving Institutions

HSI by Choice or By Circumstance: Examining R1 Hispanic Serving Institutions

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Representing 18% of the U.S. population, the growth of the Latinx population continues to grow and disperse throughout the nation. According to the Pew Research Center, the growth of the Latinx population accounts for more than half of the total U.S. population growth since 2010, with Texas, California, and Florida experiencing the largest share of the Latinx population growth. Similarly, higher education institutions throughout the nation, and within these specific states, have seen significant increases in Latinx student enrollment.

Students Leave Campus for Thanksgiving—Will They Return?

Students Leave Campus for Thanksgiving—Will They Return?

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Kentucky got beat by Alabama pretty bad last Saturday in football. But I’m sure my friend Ted Schatzki, a professor of Geography, and of Philosophy and Sociology, and the former senior associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Kentucky is more concerned if his school will get badly beaten-up by the coronavirus over the next few months. Students at UK began clearing out last weekend from university housing to begin their journey home. They’re expected to stay there after the holiday, take exams online, and then return at the end of January. But will they return to campus? Will it be safe enough?

Democracy, Diversity Back on Track

Democracy, Diversity Back on Track

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A Trump concession? Don’t expect to see one, unless it’s a hot dog cart on Fifth Ave. The soon-to-be-former commander-in-chief is showing no grace, saying “I won this election by a lot,” in tweets flagged by Twitter for accuracy. His lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani, one-time American hero, now disgraced star of the new Borat movie, talks about election theft.

by Russell Lowery-Hart

In 2015, Amarillo College (AC) focused on its key student success progress and completion points. The data told a disappointing and even devastating story. Using “secret shoppers,” data summits, focus group and survey data, AC identified key reasons our students were not successful — poverty, bureaucracy and lack of relational connection and support.

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The experiences of student parents pursuing a college education amid the COVID-19 pandemic was the focus of Thursday’s Achieving the Dream Student Parent Success Summit. 

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Looking to improve success rates for local students, the city partnered with the Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) to establish the Octavius Catto Scholarship, which was named in honor of the civil rights activist and educator.

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The Big Bend Community College in Moses Lake, Washington — a Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) — was awarded a $3 million grant from the Department of Education, reported iFIBER One News. This new Title V grant will be divided among the next five years to benefit low-income and Hispanic students, expanding educational opportunities and access to […]

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Dr. John Roueche credits his success to many mentors: His father who fought in World War II. His mother who worked two jobs. His nanny who taught him the value of diversity and inclusion in a segregated, working-class town in North Carolina. His grandfather who taught him to read confidently at an early age by […]

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Black Issues

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MSNBC’s Joy Reid is joining the Howard University faculty as a visiting professor in the Spring semester. Reid, who hosts “The Reid Out,” will teach a course titled, “Covering Race, Gender & Politics in the Digital Age,” and will hold the Hearst visiting professorship in the university’s Department of Media, Journalism and Film housed within […]

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Howard University’s School of Social Work has received $1 million to create the Fred Taylor “Roll Away the Stone” Program, a new certificate program for human service leadership for nonprofit and public service professionals. The funding will also offer financial assistance to social work master’s students selected as “Fred Taylor Emerging Leaders.” The gift from […]

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by Ben Jealous

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris made a brilliant choice in opening her remarks at the Democratic presidential ticket’s victory celebration with a quote from civil rights icon and former Georgia congressman John Lewis, who wrote before he died, “Democracy is not a state. It is an act.”

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Asian American Issues

John A. Logan College Cancels Diversity Events, Citing Fear of Trump’s Recent Executive Order
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John A. Logan College canceled all planned diversity activities last week, citing concerns that the school could lose federal funding if it violates President Donald Trump’s Sept. 22 executive order, which prohibits workforce diversity trainings that are “offensive and anti-American race and sex stereotyping and scapegoating,” FOX 28 reported. According to college officials, they “will […]

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UC San Diego will run a new program in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies starting in the fall, according to university officials. It will offer UC San Diego’s first minor in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies. The program is in the Institute of Arts and Humanities, where 14 other programs – including African […]

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A new study found evidence that counters legal complaints that Asian American students faced consequences if they were not admitted and or did not attend their first-choice school, according to the American Educational Research Association (AERA). The two complaints, filed by the Coalition of Asian American Associations and the Asian American Coalition for Education (AACE), […]

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Latino Issues

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Dr. Marielena DeSanctis will be the next president of Community College of Denver (CCD), effective Jan. 15, 2021. “With six years of experience as an engineer for a top manufacturing company and over 22 years as a leader in education, Dr. DeSanctis exemplifies deep understanding of issues facing students and higher education, a bold vision […]

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Latinx students have a greater aversion to taking on student loan debt than their White peers, according to a new study by the civil rights group UnidosUS in partnership with the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Law and the UNC Center for Community Capital.

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The Big Bend Community College in Moses Lake, Washington — a Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) — was awarded a $3 million grant from the Department of Education, reported iFIBER One News. This new Title V grant will be divided among the next five years to benefit low-income and Hispanic students, expanding educational opportunities and access to […]

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American Indian Issues

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The U.S. House has approved the Lumbee Recognition Act, a bill to give the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina federal recognition, WBTW reported. The bill will now go to the Senate after House approval for the bill came Monday afternoon. The Lumbee Recognition Act “would give Lumbee Tribe members access to services and benefits provided […]

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Native American studies departments and programs in higher education do more than just teach about the oppression of Native Americans in U.S. history. They are working to preserve indigenous cultures by introducing and expanding coursework that offers strong ties to community building.

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About 300 distinct Indigenous languages flourished among Native American nations before European colonizers set foot in what would become the U.S. Today, only about a third of those languages exist. Of those, about 90% are at risk of becoming extinct by 2050, according to the National Congress of American Indians.

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