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NEWS ROUNDUP

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As a self-described “starving actress” and someone who grew up in Los Angeles, pursuing the film and television industry was an obvious choice for Tonya Butler. She decided to take her interest in the entertainment industry one step further and pursued a law degree. On the first day of law school at California Western School […]

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As a self-described “starving actress” and someone who grew up in Los Angeles, pursuing the film and television industry was an obvious choice for Tonya Butler. She decided to take her interest in the entertainment industry one step further and pursued a law degree. On the first day of law school at California Western School […]

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The combination of a coronavirus-halted economy, an upcoming election and an ever-mounting student debt crisis has thrust the topic of student loan forgiveness to the forefront of the national conversation in recent weeks. But just who — and who doesn’t —  support student loan forgiveness? The answer may not be as bipartisan as previously assumed, suggests a study published by College Finance.

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As New York reaches more than 83,700 coronavirus cases, Gov. Andrew Cuomo is turning to college campuses to provide much needed space for hospital beds. To prepare, a number of CUNY and State University of New York (SUNY) campus dorms have been vacated to serve as emergency medical centers. For the CUNY system, the transition poses a particular challenge. The campuses are a popular, affordable option for the city’s low-income students, including students who are home insecure.

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In many cases, state regulators have either failed to recognize warning signs or taken early action to prevent school closures, according to new research.

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by Lois Elfman

s the college athletics regulator, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), deliberates over establishing guidelines on how much a student athlete should be allowed to profit off their name, image and likeness (NIL), more than a dozen states are planning to introduce their own laws that will govern the extent to which these players can benefit from their brand identities. 

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by Lois Elfman

Many of today’s students are frustrated and even dissuaded by the hoops they have to jump through to secure financial aid, but accessible and transparent information can change that. “There are so many financing potholes in the financial aid process. It’s a wonder anybody gets through it unscathed,” said Dr. Carlo Salerno, author of a […]

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VIEWS >>

Three Steps to Civic Love in the Time of COVID-19

by Patrice Rankine

To serve those to whom we belong well, attentiveness and affinity are key. Affinity and awareness amount to a form of love. Serving well is love in the time of COVID-19, and I offer these three steps to consider.

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

A Purpose Driven Life

In this issue: Diverse salutes Dr. Curtis L. Ivery, recipient of the 2020 Diverse Champions Award.


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Preserving the Espíritu Guerrero of Our Children During Covid-19

Preserving the Espíritu Guerrero of Our Children During Covid-19

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Like many mother scholars, I am forced to navigate professional responsibilities while consciously being the best mother I can be. This pandemic has made me especially aware of my energy, the expectations I have of my children/partner, and the need to help keep their espíritu guerrero alive and jovial.

A Message to Educators: Hygiene, Hand Washing, and Cultural Considerations Before, During, and After Health Crises

A Message to Educators: Hygiene, Hand Washing, and Cultural Considerations Before, During, and After Health Crises

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Like medical and mental health professionals, educators who are ignorant and incompetent relative to culture (especially those other than their own) can and have been harmful by contributing to school-based racialized trauma. ‘Do no harm’ must not be tossed aside like old news and discarded like trash when teaching, counseling, and delivering other health services. Doing so is a disgrace to the education profession and an affront to Black and other culturally different students, families, and communities.

Coronavirus Is Not a “Chinese Virus”

Coronavirus Is Not a “Chinese Virus”

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All anybody can talk about, even think about, is corona virus, COVID 19, the novel disease that has overwhelmed the world and brought human interaction to a hard stop. Calling it “the Chinese virus” only worsens the situation. Regardless of whether it is deemed “racist,” the persistent use of the term even after protests, is problematic. It only harms our efforts to control the spread of illness by adding animosity to the air.

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The Excelsior Scholarship, New York’s tuition-free program, only reaches a small portion of low-income and community college students within the state, according to a new brief.

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On Tuesday, day three of the Community College National Legislative Summit, Diane Auer Jones, the U.S. Department of Education’s principal deputy under secretary, highlighted the government’s upcoming priorities for community colleges.

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By implementing a transfer dual-enrollment program, North Carolina State University (NC State) aims to increase the attendance rates of low-to-moderate-income and first-generation students.

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Community college students have the opportunity to present their science, technology, engineering and mathematics projects and ideas through a national innovation competition starting in March. The initiative is the brainchild of the National Science Foundation and the American Association of Community Colleges.

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam proposed a plan to make community college free for residents from low- or middle-income backgrounds going into particular fields with skilled labor shortages in Virginia.

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Black Issues

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Congress and the White House have agreed to provide $1 billion in emergency funds to historically Black colleges and universities, tribal colleges and universities, and other minority serving institutions to help them cope with the coronavirus pandemic, said the United Negro College Fund in a statement on Wednesday.

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Senators Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Doug Jones (D-AL) on Thursday pressed for $1.5 billion in emergency funding to help historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority-serving institutions (MSIs) respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

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Four years ago, at George Mason University, Black students in the honors college started asking questions: Who were the slaves of George Mason IV, the 18th-century Virginia lawmaker whose name marks the school, and what were their lives like? Those discussions turned into a research program, which culminated in the Enslaved People of George Mason Memorial Project, a plan to add monuments commemorating George Mason IV’s slaves in the center of campus next year.

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Latino Issues

by Lois Elfman

As Latino/Hispanic faculty associations strive to increase recruitment and retention, students are feeling the positive impact. Not only do faculty association events — both structured and informal — enable faculty members to connect and share their experiences, they also include opportunities to connect with students and expand the pipeline to new talent in the academy.

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California Rep. Nanette Barragán remembers her immigrant parents telling her, “Doctor or lawyer – that’s the only way you’re going to get out of poverty.” She shared the memory Wednesday at the third annual Latina Leaders Summit hosted by The Hill, which brought women together to discuss how policymakers can level the playing field for Latinas in politics, education and the workforce.

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Showcasing both the ingenuity and struggles of Latinx scholars in the academy, this year’s American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) conference focused on the future.

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Asian American Issues

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The U.S. Department of Justice, in an amicus brief filed on Tuesday to a federal appeals court, is arguing against a ruling from last October, which defended Harvard’s use of affirmative action in its admission process.

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Asian students and members of the University of Albany Asian American Alliance are requesting that the Dean of Student Office “investigates” a coronavirus-themed party hosted by students at the University of Albany over the weekend. In a statement posted to Instagram, the Asian American Alliance wrote, “As members of the Asian community on campus, your […]

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Since a case of the coronavirus was confirmed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison last week, Cynthia Liu, a senior, said she’s seeing an increase in discrimination against Asian students on campus. But this isn’t just a University of Wisconsin problem.

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American Indian Issues

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Senators Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Doug Jones (D-AL) on Thursday pressed for $1.5 billion in emergency funding to help historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other minority-serving institutions (MSIs) respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

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In the sciences, only 48 research doctorates were awarded to Native American and Alaska Native students, out of the 11,764 doctorates awarded to U.S. residents in 2012. The Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership supports Native American scholars pursuing graduate education in STEM disciplines.

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Through a partnership with the University of Wyoming (UW) and the Northern Arapaho Tribe, an immersion dual language school will be established for K-16 students to help save the Arapaho language from extinction.

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Critical Questions about the Relationships among Viewpoint Diversity and Other Aspects of Diversity

Dr. Jamal Watson, executive editor of Diverse: Issues In Higher Education moderates a panel discussion on Viewpoint Diversity at the Heterodox Academy conference in New York City. 

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