Higher Education News and Jobs

Message to our Readers



by Pearl Stewart

As Virginia Tech University approached its Aug. 24 planned hybrid opening of the fall semester, the institution’s leaders were closely monitoring COVID-19 outbreaks and responses on other campuses as well as assessing their own situation.

Read more
by

The death of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday at the age of 87 dealt a stinging blow to higher education, which looked to Ginsburg as a progressive voice on the high court who could be counted on to champion equity issues.

Read more
by

A task force formed by The Steve Fund — a nonprofit focused on the mental health of youth of color — recently released a report that advises colleges and employers on how best to help students of color with mental health issues in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a struggling economy and ongoing racial […]

Read more

by

With a plan to pursue a postsecondary degree, Frederick Kakumba left Uganda in 1964 to come to the United States. “The opportunity came and I wanted to use it to help people in Africa,” said Kakumba, a retired Hudson Valley Community College (HVCC) professor. However, the transition was not easy. In school, he experienced racism and found it difficult to adjust to American culture.

Read more
by

As colleges and universities across the nation face budgetary cuts in the wake of COVID-19, including faculty layoffs, the fear is that minoritized faculty and staff could be hardest hit. Some are raising concern about St. Cloud State University’s decision to layoff three employees — two of whom are women of color, and one of […]

Read more
by Lois Elfman

To help advance momentum toward restoring Pell Grant eligibility for incarcerated individuals, IHEP released a report on gathering valuable data to support the advocacy.

Read more

VIEWS >>



Higher Education’s Racial Reckoning

by Lynn Pasquerella






If the Storm Keeps Raging

by Dereck J. Rovaris Sr.






BLOG >>

Voter Suppression During COVID-19

Voter Suppression During COVID-19

by

Since the United States’ founding, our elections have been fraught with fraud, abuses of power, and the suppression of particular voices. After the enactment of the 15th amendment, which granted the right to vote to former slaves and people of color, numerous measures were put forth to suppress the votes of communities of color. In recent decades, such efforts have come in the form of strict voter ID laws, cuts to early voting days, and purges of voter rolls, to name a few.

Downplaying Coronavirus and the New Town and Gown

Downplaying Coronavirus and the New Town and Gown

by

Journalist Bob Woodward’s new book, Rage, had pre-release bombshell when it was revealed last week that President Donald Trump essentially confessed to downplaying his knowledge of the coronavirus.

Miseducating Black Students as a Form of Educational Malpractice and Professional Betrayal

Miseducating Black Students as a Form of Educational Malpractice and Professional Betrayal

by

Professional malpractice in education is a reality and it must be interrogated. Our field is not exempt from accountability; what we do can truly save lives.

by

The Center for Community College Student Engagement’s new report analyzed the impact of guided pathways practices at community colleges across the country.

Read more
by Michael A. Baston

To say we live in interesting times is a vast understatement. The confluence of the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic upheaval, combined with the structural racism and the ensuing race-related tragedies that continue to plague our nation, has created a “perfect storm” of conditions shining a glaring light on the inequities in our society. Community college presidents are in the eye of this storm, and it is critical for us to demonstrate a commitment to eradicating racism and supporting social justice and, more importantly, to set forth a strategy to effect reform and achieve inclusive excellence.

Read more
by

In the wake of COVID-19, community colleges and for-profit institutions as well as Black and male students were the highest impacted by continued online learning during the 2020 summer enrollment.

Read more
by

Dr. Diana Doyle, president of Arapahoe Community College (ACC), announced that she will retire in June 2021, the school reported. During her presidency, which will span over 11 years upon retirement, ACC established support services for veterans and students with disabilities and created three health service bachelor’s degree programs. Additionally, Doyle oversaw the building of […]

Read more
by

By combining federal financial aid, the State of Maryland’s Promise Scholarship, City of Baltimore support, scholarship opportunities and CARES Act funding, Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) announced it will offer free tuition to eligible students entering or returning for the upcoming fall semester. “Boasting the lowest in-state tuition in Maryland, BCCC is removing a major […]

Read more

Black Issues

by

Pro Football Hall of Famer Deion Sanders was named head football coach at Jackson State University, an HBCU based in Jackson, Mississippi, according to The Associated Press Sanders is currently the offensive coordinator at Trinity Christian School-Cedar Hill in Texas.  This will be his first stint as a head football coach. Acting Jackson State President […]

Read more
by

After nearly two months of legal dispute, Lincoln University’s board of trustees unanimously voted Saturday to keep Dr. Brenda A. Allen as university president for a new five-year term, effective July 1, 2020, The Philadelphia Tribune reported. Lincoln University of Pennsylvania is one of the U.S.’s oldest historically Black colleges and universities. A Chester County judge […]

Read more
by

Researchers at The Ohio State University, the University of Florida, and the National Academy Foundation have been awarded a nearly $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their project, “Facilitating Pathways to Success for High-Achieving Pre-Collegiate African American Males in STEM,” according to an Ohio State University press release. The grant will be […]

Read more

Asian American Issues

by

UC San Diego will run a new program in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies starting in the fall, according to university officials. It will offer UC San Diego’s first minor in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies. The program is in the Institute of Arts and Humanities, where 14 other programs – including African […]

Read more
by

A new study found evidence that counters legal complaints that Asian American students faced consequences if they were not admitted and or did not attend their first-choice school, according to the American Educational Research Association (AERA). The two complaints, filed by the Coalition of Asian American Associations and the Asian American Coalition for Education (AACE), […]

Read more
by

Following a two-year investigation, the U.S. Justice Department determined on Thursday that Yale University is “illegally discriminating against Asian American and white applicants, in violation of federal civil rights law,” reports the Associated Press. Yale “rejects scores of Asian American and white applicants each year based on their race, whom it otherwise would admit,” the […]

Read more

Latino Issues

by

Bellevue President Dr. Mary Hawkins has been named the 2020 recipient of the Ohtli Award, one of the highest awards given by the Government of Mexico to those who work with the Mexican community abroad, according to a Bellevue University press release. The Ohtli Award is presented to those who have dedicated their work to […]

Read more
by

Twenty-five years after California banned consideration of race or ethnicity in public education, Latinos became the largest ethnic group among freshmen admitted to the University of California system for the first time. But some affirmative action advocates are wary of celebrating, saying that affirmative action is still necessary, reports The Sacramento Bee. “How many years, […]

Read more
by

In a new analysis, Excelencia in Education looked at current federal COVID-19 funding proposals as well as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act and its impact on Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs).

Read more

American Indian Issues

by

The Navajo Nation now has the highest per capita coronavirus infection rate in the country, surpassing New York and New Jersey, with 4,842 cases and 158 coronavirus deaths as of May 27, according to the Navajo Department of Health. The tribe is in an official state of emergency. What does that mean for Diné College, a tribal college serving Navajo students?

Read more
by

Bay Mills Community College, a tribal college in Michigan, got a request from its community two weeks ago, to make face masks for local workers providing key services as the coronavirus spreads. The school’s advanced manufacturing program got to work, designing a lightweight, reusable face shield. Using 3D printing technology, they plan to produce 3,000 shields in three weeks.

Read more
by

Tribal colleges and universities – which serve over 16,000 Native American students – have been hard hit by the coronavirus, as they try to support some of the poorest student populations in remote rural areas with limited technology and funds.

Read more