Higher Education News and Jobs

NEWS ROUNDUP

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Two people were killed and three wounded in a shooting near Alabama State University campus on Thursday night. University leadership confirmed Friday that one of the victims shot was an Alabama State University student. The student was left unnamed. “My heart is heavy today because it’s difficult to look a parent in the face and […]

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Acclaimed author Paule Marshall, whose writings often reflected on her own heritage, the complexity of Black identities and racism, has died at the age of 90. Scholars say the Brooklyn-born daughter of Barbadian immigrants was an inspiring literary figure whose empowerment of African-diaspora women touched a wide and diverse audience.

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College Access Now, a Seattle-based, regionally focused nonprofit, will become a part of College Possible, a national nonprofit focused on college accessibility for low-income students. College Access Now will be renamed College Possible Washington. Leaders of the two organizations, both first-generation college graduates, see the merger as a way to better help students.

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by Pearl Stewart

For Dr. Yvette Pearson, an associate dean in Rice University’s Brown School of Engineering, the award of a $2.66-million National Science Foundation grant to Rice and two other Houston institutions means that other scholars may not have to experience some of the difficulties she faced early in her career.

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Plan International USA, a non-profit organization focused on ending poverty, recently received a $12-million donation to fund a new program to help young girls around the world pursue an education and feel safe within their communities.

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Transitioning to college can be scary. Students often leave behind their familiar surroundings for new peers and places. They confront a whole new set of academic challenges and they don’t always know what to expect, especially underrepresented students. But there are things students, parents and universities can do to make the transition more smooth.

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Using education and activism to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline is an ongoing battle that is as fierce as ever, according to speakers at the 2019 Summer Educator Forum presented by the Center for Education at the University of Pittsburgh. During the three-day event in July, a record 450 students, teachers, administrators, scholars, activists and experts in education, criminal justice and restorative justice shared strategies in line with this year’s theme, “Dismantling the School-to-Prison Pipeline: Re-Imagining Policies, Practices, and Politics in Education Systems.”

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VIEWS >>

Academic Bullying: Higher Education’s Dirty Little Secret

by Tai Harden-Moore

When we think about workplace bullying, we often think of it in terms of the corporate world, not higher education. Yet, academic bullying – workplace bullying that takes place in institutions of higher education – can no longer remain a dirty little secret. It’s a persistent issue in higher education that must be addressed. Once the issue is out in the open, it is the responsibility of the individual institution to work to change their culture.

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Time to Shine

In this issue: Trump administration's Johnathan Holifield works to broaden opportunity for HBCUs.


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Three Key Groups Too Often Left Out of Diversity Assessments of Campus Climates

Three Key Groups Too Often Left Out of Diversity Assessments of Campus Climates

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College leaders have begun to realize that assessing their campus climate and culture for diversity is paramount. A crappy climate does not enhance the likelihood that students from diverse backgrounds will enroll, achieve and graduate, and it can constrain the level of interactions that help all members of the campus to feel safe, productive and successful.

Is Your School a True Sanctuary?

Is Your School a True Sanctuary?

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When I drive through a campus district, or even a whole town or city where the university is a major institution, I always get that special feeling, that sense of comfort. They are sanctuaries, to some degree, at least to me. And if they aren’t for everyone, maybe you should ask your college administration.

Academic Bigotry is Back, Thanks to Amy Wax

Academic Bigotry is Back, Thanks to Amy Wax

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Dr.  Amy Laura Wax, who holds the Robert Mundheim chair at the University of Pennsylvania, recently gave a speech in Washington, D.C. She has made herself a celebrity among academic bigots.Using a term she coined “cultural distance nationalism,” she stated: “We are better off if our country is dominated numerically, demographically, politically, at least in fact if not formally, by people from the First World, from the West, than by people from countries that had failed to advance.”

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Many higher education researchers and student-success advocates have long criticized no-credit remedial or developmental education in community colleges as a “trap” – an unintentional barrier to student success, particularly for its impact on low-income and minority students’ persistence and completion outcomes.

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A new program at Rockland Community College in New York provides training courses for middle skills-level jobs that require a high school education but not necessarily a college degree. Career Skills Academy, previously known as Middle Skills Academy, has piloted four programs and is planning to debut three more this fall.

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by Ángel Cabrera and Joelle Phillips

For over a third of American undergraduate students, pursuit of a college education begins at community college. Excellent community colleges propel students of all backgrounds into the middle class.

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This week, the State Council of Higher Education of Virginia announced their approved plans to provide community college students a smoother transition into a four year institution.The Passport Program requires community college students to take general education classes that would be accepted at almost every public four-year university.

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California Governor Gavin Newsom has signed a law that will eliminate the three-year cap on the transfer of sick leave between districts at all education levels.

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Black Issues

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As a historian who happens to have an a­ffinity for jazz, Dr. Maurice Jackson of Georgetown University combines both in a book that explores the America-born musical genre’s presence in Washington, D.C. and its intersections with government, politics, race, religion and higher education.

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There are opportunities for educators and policymakers to improve African-American and Hispanic males’ employment attainment by implementing practices and policies that drive the underrepresented group’s educational persistence and completion, according to new data from the Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education at Clemson University.

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One of the things I love most about writing for Diverse is that it provides an opportunity for me to think through our increasingly complicated political space. Exploring the intersection of politics, pop culture and higher education also provides a platform to align pedagogy with public scholarship. I approach this column as I approach my classroom: my job isn’t to tell people how to think; but to provide them with information that encourages them to think critically and analytically.

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Latino Issues

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California Rep. Nanette Barragán remembers her immigrant parents telling her, “Doctor or lawyer – that’s the only way you’re going to get out of poverty.” She shared the memory Wednesday at the third annual Latina Leaders Summit hosted by The Hill, which brought women together to discuss how policymakers can level the playing field for Latinas in politics, education and the workforce.

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Showcasing both the ingenuity and struggles of Latinx scholars in the academy, this year’s American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) conference focused on the future.

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The goal of the HSI Pathways program is to increase the number of Latino faculty in the humanities. Funded by a five-year, $5.1 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the program is on track to prepare 90 students from Florida International University, the University of Texas El Paso and California State University, Northridge – all Hispanic serving institutions (HSIs) – for careers in academia.

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Asian American Issues

by Jessica Fry

When I was a freshman in high school, I was walking to my geometry class for sixth period. A loud voice boomed down the hall, “Hey, Korean trash, go home!” In an almost exclusively White high school, I knew that the insult was being hurled at me.

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I have been studying the internment of Japanese Americans ever since I have been a professor. Yet I have had the most important insight, personally as an Asian American albeit not Japanese originally, only recently. To explain why the mass incarceration during World War II of 120,000 individuals on the basis of heritage, two-thirds of them native-born citizens of this nation, was wrong requires pointing out that the people who are most offended about the violation of civil rights are those who subscribe in the ideals of the United States.

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The Arizona Cardinals made history when the team chose Kyler Murray, who is of Asian lineage, as the number-one pick in the National Football League draft last week, according to ASAMNews. The young quarterback’s mother, Misun (Missy) Murray, is half Korean and his father, Kevin Murray, is African-American. Kyler’s mother said she is used to […]

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American Indian Issues

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Following the widely reported maltreatment of two indigenous students on a college campus visit last year, the American Indian College Fund initiated a collaborative project that has produced a study recommending ways to improve access, inclusion and equity for Native students seeking higher education.

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by Lois Elfman

Building a supportive network is crucial for Native American scholars, many of whom are the only scholars in their field at a college or university.

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The education of Native American youth was part of the charter when Dartmouth College opened its stately doors two and a half centuries ago. But it wasn’t until recent years that the school began graduating indigenous students in significant numbers, and its Native American Studies program has emerged as one of the strongest in the United States.

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Critical Questions about the Relationships among Viewpoint Diversity and Other Aspects of Diversity

Dr. Jamal Watson, executive editor of Diverse: Issues In Higher Education moderates a panel discussion on Viewpoint Diversity at the Heterodox Academy conference in New York City. 

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